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Winter Quarter

Knowledge 

EDUC 212 Urban Education (A. Ball) (3-4) (PK12, NP, EP, ET)
For students who are interested in teaching or leading in urban school settings, this course takes social science and historical perspectives to look at the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
EDUC 241 Race, Justice, and Integration (E. Callan) (3) (PK12, HE, EP, NP) 
Recent philosophical research on injustice, race, and the ideal of racial integration. 
EDUC 277 Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives (A. Padilla) (4) (PK12, EP, NP) 
Historical and contemporary approaches to educating immigrant students. Case study approach focuses on urban centers to demonstrate how stressed urban educational agencies serve immigrants and native-born U.S. students when confronted with overcrowded classrooms, controversy over curriculum, current school reform movements, and government polices regarding equal educational opportunity.
EDUC 280 Learning & Teaching of Science (C. Wieman) (3) (HE)
This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
EDUC 346 Research Seminar in Higher Education (W. Damon, M. Stevens) (4) (HE)
Major issues, current structural features of the system, the historical context that shaped it, and theoretical frameworks. The purposes of higher education in light of interest groups including students, faculty, administrators, and external constituents. Issues such as diversity, stratification, decentralization, and changes that cut across these groups.
EDUC 347/GSBGEN 348 The Economics of Higher Education (E. Bettinger) (4) (HE) 
Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload: costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
EDUC 354 School-Based Decision Making (G. Hoagland) (4) (PK12, NP) 
Designed with aspiring school leaders in mind, this course combines case studies, site visits, and guest speakers to take students inside school leaders' critical decision making processes. Students who wish to work at the district and school levels may be interested in this course to learn the challenges, opportunities, and contemporary practices of school-site leadership.
EDUC 405 Teaching in the Humanities (J. Wolf) (3) (PK12, HE) 
This course, designed for graduate students in the humanities and education, explores approaches to teaching the humanities at both the secondary and collegiate levels, with a focus on teaching of text, and how the humanities can help students develop the ability to read and think critically. The course explores purposes and pedagogical approaches for teaching humanities through a variety of texts and perspectives. The course is designed as an opportunity for doctoral students in the Humanities both to enrich their own teaching and to broaden their understanding of professional teaching opportunities, including community college and secondary school teaching.
EDUC 411 Early Childhood Education (D. Stipek) (1-4) (PK12, EP, NP)
This course addresses a broad set of topics that have implications for developmentally appropriate and effective early childhood education. It begins with children's social, emotional and cognitive development and issues related to poverty, culture and language. We will also examine research evidence on effective instruction for young children, evaluations of preschool interventions, and several current policy debates. 
EDUC 445/GSBGEN 335 Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform (G. Lee) (3) (PK12, NP)
This course is intended for students interested in how entrepreneurs can and have changed K-12 public schooling, and for those who aspire to be leaders in entrepreneurial and educational organizations. The course explores human capital solutions, new schools, and technology products that are designed to improve student learning and solve pain points. The course will feature for-profit, not-for-profit, and double-bottom-line organizations.
GSBGEN 345 Disruptions in Education (R. Urstein) (3) (HE) 
This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for faculty, students, and higher education administrators, as well as for entrepreneurs and the businesses that serve this huge global market. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions across the higher education landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; alternatives to the traditional credential; the impact of for-profit providers; content and the ownership and distribution of knowledge; and tertiary products and platforms that cater to the large student services market.
MS&E 274 Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy (E. Tse) (3) (NP, ET) 
This course explores how entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change of responding to change induced externally. Students will learn about advantage in emerging markets and mature markets, strategies to break through stagnation, and strategies to turn danger into opportunity. 

Theory 

EDUC 208B Curriculum Construction (D. Pope) (3-4) (PK12)
Practical aspects of curriculum design are emphasized by students working on projects for actual education clients. May be adapted to issues in higher education.
EDUC 245 Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (T. LaFromboise) (3-5) (PK12)
This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
EDUC 280 Learning & Teaching of Science (C. Wieman) (3) (HE)
This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through the creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
EDUC 288 Organizational Analysis (W. Powell) (4) (PK12, HE, EP, NP)
Pre-K - 12, higher education, and non-profit focused students should take this survey of major theoretical traditions to understand rational and non-rational behaviors of organizations. This knowledge can be applied to schools, districts, CMOs, colleges, universities, and non-profits as formal organizations. 
EDUC 306D World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (F. Ramirez) (4-5) (PK12, HE, EP)
Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility and equality; international organizations, and world culture.
EDUC 312 Relational Sociology (D. McFarland) (4) (PK12, HE, NP)
Conversations, social relationships and social networks are the core features of social life. In this course we explore how conversations, relationships, and social networks not only have their own unique and independent characteristics, but how they shape one another and come to characterize many of the settings we enter and live in. As such, students will be introduced to theories and research methodologies concerning social interaction, social relationships, and social networks, as well as descriptions of how these research strands interrelate to form a larger relational sociology that can be employed to characterize a variety of social phenomenon. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students. 
EDUC 342 Child Development & New Technologies (B. Barron, K. Forssell) (3) (PK12)
This course is for students interested in the experiences of children with computing technologies and how these might influence development. The course uses sociocultural theories of development to understand how children use technology to meet their own goals, with an emphasis on the influence of interactive technology on cognitive, identity, and social development. 
EDUC 347/GSBGEN 348 The Economics of Higher Education (E. Bettinger) (4) (HE)
Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class. 
EDUC 360 Child Development in the Contexts of Risk and Adversity (J. Obradovic) (3-4) (PK12, EP, NP)
In this course students will learn about theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to developmental psychopathology and resilience of children and adolescents. The course focuses on (1) current conceptual and empirical issues; (2) cognitive, affective, and motivational processes that underlie some of the most salient childhood mental health symptoms and disorders; (3) family, school, and cultural factors that contribute to developmental psychopathology and resilience; and (4) cutting-edge analytic methods that are currently employed in studies of developmental psychopathology and resilience.

Skills 

EDUC 200B Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods (D. Pope, J. Wolf) (4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
Students who are confident in their ability to read and understand published research (particularly quantitative) should take this course to broaden their understanding of research methods and uses. Course material and hands-on activities are likely to be directly applicable to the POLS Project/Talk.
EDUC 208B Curriculum Construction (D. Pope) (3-4) (PK12)
Practical aspects of curriculum design are emphasized by students working on projects for actual education clients. May be adapted to issues in higher education.
EDUC 280 Learning & Teaching of Science (C. Weiman) (3) (HE)
This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background..
EDUC 334A/STRAMGT 360 Strategic Educational Research and Organizational Reform Clinic (W. Koski) (4-10) (PK12, EP, NP)
This is a two-quarter clinical course offered in the Winter and Spring Quarters that brings together upper-level graduate students in education, law, and business from Stanford to collaborate with their peers at other universities (Columbia University, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan) and provide strategic research and consulting to public education organizations. Participants engage in a rigorous and rewarding learning experience, including: (i) An intensive seminar in the design, leadership and management, and transformation of public school systems, charter management organizations, start-ups, and other K-12 public- and social-sector institutions; (ii) Comprehensive skills training in team-based problem solving, strategic policy research, managing multidimensional (operational, policy, legal) projects to specified outcomes in complex environments, client counseling, and effective communication; and (iii) A high-priority consulting project for a public education sector client (e.g., school district, state education agency, charter management organization, non-profit) designing and implementing solutions to a complex problem at the core of the organization’s mission to improve the educational outcomes and life chances of children. The participant's team work will allow public agencies throughout the nation to receive relevant, timely, and high-quality research and advice on institutional reforms that otherwise may not receive the attention they deserve. Note: Enrollment in both Winter and Spring quarters is required. MA students must enroll for 4 or 5 units of credit per quarter. 
EDUC 399A Designing Surveys (A. Porteus) (1-2) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
This course is focused entirely on developing good surveys using a cognitive processing model for survey development. The course  is for students who are designing surveys  for master’s projects/theses, and PhD dissertations.  The course is experiential and more like a workshop, so students must be developing an actual survey to enroll in the course.
MS&E 175 Innovation, Creativity & Change (R. Katila) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, ET)
This course explores problem solving in organizations, creativity and innovation skills, thinking tools, and creative organizations.
ME 368 d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context (P. Klebahn, K. Segovia, R. Sutton, et al.) (1-3) (PK12, HE)
d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
PSYCH 146 Observation of Children (P. Chandra, A. Lomangino, J. Winters) (3-5) (PK12)
Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.