Master's Handbook

Introduction

This handbook provides detailed information regarding the academic policies and procedures pertinent to all Stanford Graduate School of Education Master’s students. Its purpose is to inform the students of the guidelines and milestones relevant to successful completion of their degree program, and is to be used in conjunction with the University Bulletin which describes Stanford graduate studies’ policies.

In the event any information presented in this handbook changes during the academic year, students will be notified by email.

The Academic Services office helps students and faculty interpret and follow the Stanford Graduate School of Education and Stanford University policies and procedures toward degree completion. The MA Programs Officer, Caroline Stasulat, is the primary advisor of students on university and school academic and administrative policies.

Students are responsible to follow the university and school policies described in this handbook and in the Stanford Bulletin. This includes following deadlines, maintaining adequate grade point average, and units of registration.

We hope this handbook is of good use to you. We wish you a rewarding experience during your program at the Graduate School of Education.

Graduate School of Education Academic Services

Mission Statements

Graduate School of Education Mission

Aiming towards the ideal of enabling all people to achieve maximum benefit from their educational experiences, the Stanford Graduate School of Education seeks to continue as a world leader in ground-breaking, cross-disciplinary inquiries that shape educational practices, their conceptual underpinnings, and the professions that serve the enterprise.

The School also seeks to develop the knowledge, wisdom, and imagination of its students to enable them to take leadership positions in efforts to improve the quality of education around the globe.

Office of Academic Services Mission

The Academic Services Office collaborates with students, faculty and staff in pursuing the Graduate School of Education's mission. We strive to empower students on their own unique journeys, preparing them to fulfill their academic goals and reach their potential as educational leaders. To that end, the Office provides services and resources on policies and procedures regarding academic programs and events, financial aid, admissions, career services and recruitment.

Stanford University Honor Code

In the spring of 1921, after a seven-year campaign by the student body, the first campus-wide honor system was formally adopted by the University. The code underwent various changes through the years, most recently in the spring of 1977.

The standard of academic conduct for Stanford students is as follows:

  1. The Honor Code is an undertaking of the students, individually and collectively:
    • That they will not give or receive aid in examinations; that they will not give or receive unpermitted aid in class work, in the preparation of reports, or in any other work that is to be used by the instructor as the basis of grading;
    • That they will do their share and take an active part in seeing to it that others as well as themselves uphold the spirit and letter of the Honor Code.
  2. The faculty on its part manifests its confidence in the honor of its students by refraining from proctoring examinations and from taking unusual and unreasonable precautions to prevent the forms of dishonesty mentioned above. The faculty will also avoid, as far as practicable, academic procedures that create temptations to violate the Honor Code.
  3. While the faculty alone has the right and obligation to set academic requirements, the students and faculty will work together to establish optimal conditions for honorable academic work.

Examples of conduct which have been regarded as being in violation of the Honor Code include:

  • Copying from another's examination paper or allowing another to copy from one's own paper
  • Unpermitted collaboration
  • Plagiarism
  • Revising and resubmitting a quiz or exam for re-grading, without the instructor's knowledge and consent
  • Giving or receiving unpermitted aid on a take-home examination
  • Representing as one's own work the work of another
  • Giving or receiving aid on an academic assignment under circumstances in which a reasonable person should have known that such aid was not permitted

In recent years, most student disciplinary cases have involved Honor Code violations; of these, the most frequent arise when a student submits another's work as his or her own, or gives or receives unpermitted aid. The standard penalty for a first offense includes a one-quarter suspension from the University and 40 hours of community service. In addition, most faculty members issue a "No Pass" or "No Credit" for the course in which the violation occurred. The standard penalty for a multiple violation (e.g. cheating more than once in the same course) is a three-quarter suspension and 40 or more hours of community service.

Stanford University Fundamental Standard

The Fundamental Standard has set the standard of conduct for students at Stanford since 1896. It states:

"Students at Stanford are expected to show both within and without the University such respect for order, morality, personal honor and the rights of others as is demanded of good citizens. Failure to do this will be sufficient cause for removal from the University."

Over the years, the Fundamental Standard has been applied to a great variety of situations. Actions which have been found to be in violation of it include:

  • Physical Assault
  • Property damage; attempts to damage University property
  • Theft, including theft of University property such as street signs, furniture and library books
  • Forgery, such as signing an instructor’s signature to a grade change card
  • Sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct
  • Charging computer time or long distance telephone calls to unauthorized accounts
  • Misrepresentation in seeking financial aid, University housing, discount computer purchases or other University benefits
  • Misuse of University computer equipment or e-mail
  • Driving on campus while under the influence of alcohol or drugs
  • Sending threatening and obscene messages to another student via e-mail, phone or voice-mail

There is no standard penalty that applies to violations of the Fundamental Standard. Infractions have led to penalties ranging from formal warning and community service to expulsion. In each case, the nature and seriousness of the offense, the motivation underlying the offense, and precedent in similar cases are considered.

Stanford University Patent Agreement

All faculty, staff, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are required to sign a Patent and Copyright Agreement (the SU-18 form, signed electronically in Axess) as a condition of either employment or enrollment at Stanford University. For more information see: https://gradadmissions.stanford.edu/admitted-students/entering-stanford/....

Overview of the Graduate School of Education Master's Programs

Programs Offered

Students in the Stanford Graduate School of Education pursue Master of Arts degrees in the programs listed below. These programs are commonly referred to with the abbreviations noted in parentheses.

  • Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
  • International Comparative Education (ICE)
  • International Education Policy Analysis (IEPA)
  • Joint Degree with the Stanford Law School (MA/JD)
  • Joint Degree with the Graduate School of Business (MA/MBA)
  • Joint Degree with the Public Policy Program (MA/MPP)
  • Learning, Design and Technology (LDT)
  • Policy, Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)
  • Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP)
  • Individually Designed MA (for current Stanford doctoral students)

Credentials Offered

The Graduate School of Education is authorized to recommend candidates who complete STEP for the California Preliminary Single Subject and Preliminary Multiple Subjects Teaching Credentials. For more information about STEP, please see https://gse-step.stanford.edu/about.

Coterminal Degree

All master's programs (except the Joint Degree with the Graduate School of Business and the Joint Degree with the Stanford Law School) accept coterminal students. Coterminal master's students fulfill the same Graduate School of Education program requirements as other master's students; but there are additional University unit and residency requirements for the coterminal degree. Coterminal students should refer to the Stanford Bulletin for complete policy information governing their degree status and requirements.

Coterminal students who have completed graduate course work at Stanford in previous quarters and received approval to count those units toward the MA in Education may be approved to take a reduced course load but may not drop below 8 units during Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters. While undergraduates are allowed to enroll in up to 20 units and coterminal students are allowed to enroll in up to 24 units by University standards, MA programs in the School of Education limit the number of units in which a student may enroll to no more than 18. Coterminal students who wish to enroll in less units than required by their programs or more than 18 units during a given quarter should submit a petition to the MA Programs Officer by the preliminary study list deadline. Students in the coterminal graduate student group will be charged additional tuition for each unit above 18 units, if approved.

Changing Programs

Students are admitted to a specific program, but occasionally students may wish to change their program. Transfer into a new program is subject to the approval of the new program. Fulfillment of the new program's requirements may result in delay of degree completion beyond the typical three or four quarters.

Students who wish to change their program must submit a Program Transfer Application, available here or from the MA Programs Officer. Requests to transfer to a new MA program must be approved by the student's faculty advisor, both the current and new programs' Program Directors, and the Associate Dean of Student Affairs. 

Advising

Master's students will work with their Program Director throughout the year in addition to a faculty advisor who is assigned to each student before the program begins. The Program Director and advisor assist the student in planning a program of study. Students are encouraged to have at least 2 advising appointments during the course of their program and many students meet with their advisors once every quarter. Students are encouraged to look to any member of the Graduate School of Education faculty for additional advising or mentorship, regardless of the official advisor assigned. Either the student or the faculty may request a change in assignment for any reason. To change advisors, students submit the Change of Advisor Form available here or from the MA Programs Officer. The Program Director and the new advisor must both sign off on this form. Students typically select and initiate contact with a new advisor but in cases where this is not possible, the Program Director will assign a new advisor. The MA Programs Officer is available for questions regarding University academic policy and progress toward the degree.

Timetable For The Master's Degree

The Master of Arts degree requires at least three quarters of full-time study. Students working toward advanced degrees at Stanford University must enroll for the three main quarters of each academic year (Autumn, Winter and Spring) from the time of matriculation until receipt of the degree. The ICE/IEAPA and LDT programs require an additional quarter of summer enrollment. Study at Stanford is on a full-time basis. The only exception to this requirement is for formally approved leaves of absence and for students admitted through the LDT Honors Co-op Program.

Autumn Quarter

  • Meet with advisor and program director
  • Plan initial program of study
  • Submit preliminary Program Proposal
  • ICE & IEPA Select topic for MA Paper

Winter Quarter

  • Advisor meeting recommended - discuss progress and coursework selection
  • Mid-year degree progress review
  • CTE Select topic for MA Paper
  • LDT Internship
  • LDT Select topic for Master's project

Spring Quarter

  • Meet with advisor and program director to finalize program of study
  • Submit revised program proposal
  • Meet with Director of Career Services to discuss job search
  • Participate in annual commencement ceremony
  • CTE Complete Master's Project and all coursework
  • CTE Apply to Graduate on Axess/ Degree Conferral
  • LDT Internship
  • POLS Complete all coursework
  • POLS Apply to Graduate on Axess/ Degree Conferral

Summer Quarter

  • ICE & IEPA Complete MA Paper and all coursework
  • ICE & IEPA Internship (optional)
  • ICE & IEPA Apply to Graduate on Axess/Degree Conferral
  • LDT Internship
  • LDT Complete project, portfolio and coursework
  • LDT Apply to Graduate on Axess/Degree Conferral

See Program-Specific Requirements for quarterly unit requirements.

Degree Requirements

Students are responsible to meet the University and School requirements described below throughout their program of study. Each student ensures that he or she is enrolled appropriately for degree conferral, and should direct any questions about requirements or policies to the MA Programs Officer prior to the related deadlines.

Note: There are particular set of course requirements for Joint Degree students – please see the section on the Joint Degree with the Graduate School of Business and Joint Degree with the Stanford Law School for requirements.

University Requirements

Master's Program Proposal

The Master's Program Proposal is a University-required document wherein students plan, in consultation with their advisor and Program Director, their course of study. Students must list every course they will take in fulfillment of their program's degree requirements. All students must obtain approval signatures from their advisor and Program Director and submit the form to the MA Programs Officer by the specified deadline date. Students who have not submitted the form by that time will be placed on hold. Students complete an initial plan in their first quarter; because most programs allow for some flexibility in choosing courses, students submit a revised program proposal to the MA Programs Officer by the specified deadline early in spring quarter.

2019-20 Due Dates:
Preliminary Program Proposal – Friday, October 4, 2019 (MA/MBA, MA/MPP, and POLS); Friday, November 15, 2019 (ICE/IEPA and LDT) 
Final Program Proposal – Friday, April 10, 2020

Please note that your Director/Program may have a different deadline than the one listed above.

Students must meet all of the University, School and program requirements and follow all policies listed on the Program Proposal. Failure to fulfill any requirements will delay conferral of the Master of Arts degree and further course enrollment. The MA Programs Officer verifies the Program Proposal against the student's transcript, so the two documents must match exactly. Any changes from the initial course of study planned in the first quarter must be reflected on the revised program proposal.

Unit Requirements

The minimum course unit requirement for the Master's degree in CTE, LDT and POLS is 45 units taken in residence at Stanford. The minimum course unit requirement for the Master's degree in ICE and IEPA is 48 units taken in residence at Stanford. Please refer to the joint degree sections of this handbook for the allowable combination of minimum units required to earn the MA/JD and the MA/MBA degrees.

Units earned at another institution do not count toward the minimum units required for the Master's degree at Stanford. However, previous coursework may be used to meet course requirements if equivalent studies have been pursued. (Note: Courses taken through Stanford's Exchange Scholar Program or the formal exchange program with U.C. Berkeley or U.C. San Francisco may count as part of the 45 unit minimum.) Coterminal students who have completed graduate level work in the two quarters prior to beginning their Masters program, will be able to use those units toward their MA requirements, with approval from the MA Programs Officer and Program Director.

All students must adhere to the quarterly unit requirements in their programs (see program-specific requirements for detailed information). Please note that in order to be considered a full-time graduate student at Stanford, a minimum of 8 units of enrollment is required in Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters. The maximum units allowed are 18 per quarter.

NOTE: All courses applied to the master's degree must be in courses at or above the 100 level. At least 50% must be in courses at or above the 200 level. Courses numbered below 100 are intended for undergraduates only and do not count toward graduate degrees.

Grades

In every program, one-third of the total units must be taken for a letter grade. The only exception to this is the Joint Degree with the GSB – in this program students must take 27 of the required 35 units for a letter grade (only 8 units may be taken credit/no credit). All students must also maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average. For more detailed information on grading procedures, refer to the Stanford Bulletin. Before enrolling in an independent study, students should discuss the grading basis with the supervising faculty member. In some cases, where independent study credit is offered on both a letter and credit/no-credit basis, faculty may prefer one method over another. Please discuss this with the supervising faculty member prior to the University's change of grading basis deadline.

Minimal Progress

Students must register in 11 or more units per term and pass at least eight units per term. The only exceptions to the 11-unit requirement in a given quarter are in cases of designated quarters in the ICE/IEPA, and LDT programs (see Program-Specific Requirements). Students who are approved to register in fewer than 11 units in a given term must pass at least six units. The academic progress requirements for students also include registration and timely completion of department and program requirements, such as completion of the Master's Program Proposal and the Master's Project. Students who do not meet minimal progress each term will be placed on registration or degree conferral hold until they are determined to have done so.

Degree Conferral

Students must apply for conferral of their master's degree by filing an Application to Graduate on Axess by the Registrar's quarterly deadline. The deadline for spring quarter is April 10, 2020; the deadline for summer quarter is July 31, 2020. Students must be registered in the term their degree is conferred. See the Stanford Bulletin for further policy information.

Time Limit for Completion of the Master's Degree

As stated in the Stanford Bulletin, "All requirements for a master's degree must be completed within three years after the student's first term of enrollment in the master's program (five years for Honors Cooperative students). Students pursuing a coterminal master's degree must complete their requirements within three years of their first quarter of graduate standing." See the Bulletin for further information.

Graduate School of Education Requirements

Courses

Required courses for master's degrees in the Graduate School of Education are listed on the appropriate Master's Program Proposal. Students choose electives in consultation with their faculty advisor based on relevance to the degree program and the student's academic interests.

Students are required to take a minimum of 27 units in the Graduate School of Education. An individual program's requirements may exceed this amount. Appropriate graduate-level courses in other departments of the University (e.g., Anthropology, Linguistics or Psychology), may be used to reach the program's overall unit total. Students must consult with their Program Director, advisor and the MA Programs Officer when selecting courses outside the Graduate School of Education to fulfill unit requirements.

NOTE: English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses are subject to Activity Unit limitations and cannot be applied to the master's degree.

The Master's Project

Some programs have a culminating project requirement for the Master of Arts degree. Students will receive specific instructions from their Program Director and advisor on this requirement, which is generally due sometime in the last quarter of study. Upon completion of the Master's project, students will be required to submit a Master's Thesis Submission form to the MA Programs Officer. The form is available from the MA Programs Officer or on the Graduate School of Education website.

Graduation Review

At the beginning of the student's expected final quarter, the MA Programs Officer will provide each student with a formal review of his or her progress toward fulfilling all degree requirements. It is each student's responsibility to follow up on the timely submission of any outstanding degree requirements in order to confer his or her degree.

Graduate School of Education Course Polices

Students are expected to plan their coursework for the academic year in the Autumn quarter by consulting with their advisor, program director, and Explore Courses/Axess. Questions about the time schedule may be directed to the Assistant Director of Degree Programs, Tommy Liu at liutommy@stanford.edu.

Cross-Listed Courses

There is no limit to the number of cross-listed courses that students may count toward the minimum number of Education units required for their program, except where limits are expressly placed for their particular program's requirements (for example, in the Joint Degree program with the GSB).

Non-STEP Student Enrollment in STEP Courses

STEP courses are designed specifically for students in that program. Their courses are closely integrated with one another and are typically linked to the student teaching experience. The exclusive focus of these courses on the professional preparation of teachers often makes them unsuitable for students in other programs at the Graduate School of Education. Students interested in taking STEP courses not designated "STEP only" in Explore Courses should contact the instructor of the course to determine if enrollment is possible.

Enrollment in Methodology Courses

In order to assist students with data collection and analysis for their Master's Projects, students will be required (or are highly encouraged) to enroll in a methodology class. Two methodology courses are most popular and are either required or highly recommended for the majority of MA students in the Graduate School of Education: EDUC 200A, Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation, and EDUC 200B, Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods.

Students in the CTE and LDT programs are required to take either EDUC 200A or 200B to fulfill their program's Research Methods requirement.

Students in ICE/IEAPA and POLS are required to take one methodology course from a pre-approved list for their respective programs, which include EDUC 200A and 200B.

Since EDUC 200A and 200B are courses in high demand, enrollment in both of these courses limited and registration in EDUC 200B is managed based on a priority list by program. A few additional notes:

  • Both sections of EDUC 200A and 200B will have identical curriculum/course syllabi
  • The EDUC 200A instructors will not prioritize by program. However, students in certain cohorts are likely to have a scheduling conflict with one of the two sections.
  • EDUC 200B registration is based on a priority list by program (please see table below):

EDUC 200A: Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation

Section 1 Section 2
Autumn Quarter 2019 Autumn Quarter 2019
Class # (for Registration): 3277 Class # (for Registration): 3323
Instructor: Ann Porteus Instructor: Sanne Smith
Mondays & Wednesdays 11:30am-12:50pm Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:30-2:50pm

200B: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

Section 1 Section 2
Autumn Quarter 2019 Winter Quarter 2020
Class # (for Registration): 3278 Class # (for Registration): 2555
Instructor: Denise Pope Instructor: Ann Jaquith
Thursdays 9:00-11:50am Thursdays 1:30-4:20pm
REGISTRATION PRIORITY
1st: LDT 1st: ICE/IEAPA
2nd: POLS and CTE 2nd: CTE and POLS
3rd: ICE/IEAPA 3rd: LDT

Program-Specific Requirements

Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)

Program Requirements

Each MA candidate will work closely with a faculty advisor to develop an individualized program of study that reflects the student's particular interests. As students in this program are not part of a cohort taking courses together, they must be able to work independently, under an advisor's supervision, in order to complete program requirements based on current course offerings. It is both the advisor's and the student's responsibility to make sure that each student successfully completes a coherent program of study and research that advances the student's professional goals.

Students have the opportunity to develop specializations around particular subject matters or areas (e.g., English, literacy, mathematics, science, history) depending upon their interests and their advisor's areas of expertise. These specializations are negotiated individually with the faculty advisor and are contingent upon course offerings and directed reading/research opportunities. Students can take courses across the Graduate School of Education and the university at large. In addition to coursework, students conduct a final project that will allow them to focus in depth on a particular area of interest.

Students must complete at least 45 units at Stanford to receive the Master's degree in CTE. The following constraints are placed on those 45 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 23 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 or 190 count toward this requirement).
  • At least 27 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units).
  • At least 15 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the master's degree.
  • Students must enroll in a minimum of 11 units during Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters, and cannot exceed 18 units in any quarter.
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.
  • See the "Coterminal Degree" section for unit requirements applying to students admitted through the coterminal degree program.

Breadth Requirements

Students are required to complete courses fulfilling the 2 breadth requirements: Behavioral & Social Sciences and Normative Studies. See below for a list of pre-approved courses.

Research Methods

Students must take at least one course in this category, both courses are recommended. Please consult with your advisor as soon as possible.

EDUC 200A Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation
EDUC 200B Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods *

*In Autumn and Winter quarter, CTE students have second enrollment priority for EDUC 200B. Please see the Enrollment in Methodology Courses section of the MA Handbook for more information.

Project/Thesis

Units for the Master's project/thesis can be taken through EDUC 180 "Directed Reading"; EDUC 190 "Directed Research"; or EDUC 185 "Master's Thesis". Students can enroll in 1-3 units of independent study units during Autumn quarter and 1-5 units during Winter and Spring quarters.

Please note that the university deadline to turn in your project/thesis and Thesis Submission Form to your advisor is Wednesday, June 7 at noon. Your advisor may set an earlier deadline. If you would like your final project/thesis to be bound and catalogued in the Cubberley Library, a few additional steps need to be taken: (1) update the signature and title page available from the MA Programs Officer; (2) obtain your advisor's signature; (3) print out a copy of your final project/thesis; and (4) submit it to the Cubberley library.

2019-20 Pre-Approved Courses Meeting the Breadth Requirements

Note: Other courses may be taken to fulfill these requirements. Your advisor will need to approve any course substitutions and notify the MA Programs Officer via email. All course information is subject to change. Please consult ExploreCourses and Axess for the most updated course offering and scheduling information. 

Behavioral and Social Sciences

A minimum of 1 course is required. Anthropology, Economics, Politics of Education, Psychology, and Sociology

Normative Studies

A minimum of 1 course is required. Philosophy, Aesthetics, and History of Education

International Comparative Education (ICE) / International Education Policy Analysis (IEPA)

Program Requirements

Students must complete at least 48 units at Stanford to receive a Master's degree in ICE or IEPA. The following constraints are placed on those 48 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 24 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 or 190 count toward this requirement).
  • At least 30 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units).
  • At least 16 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the master's degree.
  • Students must enroll in a minimum of 8 units during Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters, and cannot exceed 18 units in any quarter.
  • ICE/IEPA students must choose one of the following unit plans. Combinations, alterations, or exceptions to these unit plans are not allowable.
    • Enroll in at least 11 units Autumn and Winter quarter, at least 8 units Spring quarter and exactly 6 units in Summer quarter OR
    • Enroll in at least 11 units Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarter and exactly 3 units in Summer quarter
    Note: Students must enroll in at least 6 units during all quarters (including Summer) in which they wish to maintain eligibility to receive financial aid (such as loans).
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.
  • All courses taken outside the GSE must be approved by the Program Director.
  • See the "Coterminal Degree” section for unit requirements applying to students admitted through the coterminal degree program.

Required Courses

Note: All course information is subject to change. Please consult ExploreCourses and Axess for final course offerings.

Students in the program are required to take the EDUC 206 series in order to complete their MA paper requirement. By enrolling in EDUC 206A, B, C and D, students are advised through the entire process of developing their projects up to the completion of their papers at the end of Summer Quarter. In order to make satisfactory academic progress in the ICE/IEPA program, students must have their MA paper proposals approved by the start of Spring quarter. Failure to do so means that the student is not making satisfactory progress and will trigger an academic review.

306 Series

Enroll in two (students are encouraged to enroll in all three): 

Research Methods

Choose one from the following:

Students who plan to use qualitative methods for their master's papers must take both EDUC 200A and 200B.

Students who plan to collect their own data for their MA papers are required to enroll in EDUC 206B for 3 units and take no more than three additional courses in both Winter and Spring quarters. In addition, in Spring quarter, they must enroll in a Directed Reading or Directed Research with one of their advisors, which will count as one of their main courses.

For those who plan to conduct quantitative data analyses, in addition to (or in place of) EDUC 200A, students have the option of enrolling in the following courses: EDUC 326, 400A, 400B, 423, 430A, 430B, ECON 102B, or an equivalent with approval from the program director. Students often take more than one of these courses and are highly encouraged to take a mini course in methodology (e.g., SPSS and/or Stata). 

Students who plan to collect their own quantitative data using survey methods (interviews, questionnaires) for their MA papers are required to take EDUC 399A: Designing Surveys.

Additional Requirements for IEPA

Choose one of the following (students are encouraged to enroll in both):

English for Foreign Students

Non-fluent speakers of English are strongly encouraged to take one of the following writing courses:

Additional ICE-Related Courses Offered in the GSE in 2019-2020 (Recommended)

Project: MA Paper (Due Wednesday, July 29, 2020)

Joint Degree with the Graduate School of Business (MA/MBA)

Program Requirements

Joint MA/MBA students spend most of their first year fulfilling the requirements of the MBA curriculum. Students may take Graduate School of Education (GSE) courses once they begin enrolling in electives, typically Spring quarter of their first year. During their second year, students have the opportunity to take a variety of courses at the GSB and the GSE.

The following section pertains to the Graduate School of Education (GSE) requirements for the MA portion of the Joint MA/MBA degree. In addition to the following guidelines, students should consult the academic requirements specified by the Graduate School of Business (GSB) for the MBA portion of the Joint MA/MBA and the Stanford Bulletin.

Students must complete at least 35 units of instruction for the MA portion of their MA/MBA joint degree. The following constraints are placed on those 35 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 18 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 and 190 can count toward this requirement).
  • At least 27 of the 35 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units). If a student wishes to earn the remaining 8 units outside of the Graduate School of Education (non EDUC units), the student is expected to submit a petition to Emi Kuboyama by the end of week one of the quarter during which the student enrolls in the course, explaining how these units relate to and support the student's educational goals.
  • At least 27 of the 35 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Pass/Fail). 
  • A maximum of 10 cross-listed units may count toward both degrees.
  • A maximum of 4 independent study units (e.g., internship, directed reading, directed research) from the Graduate School of Education may be applied toward the MA degree.
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the MA degree.
  • Students may not enroll in Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) courses.
  • Any other course policies set forth in the MBA Student Handbook apply.

Cross-listed Courses

The two schools will offer a menu of cross-listed courses particularly suited to the program, and students can earn up to 10 of their 27 Education units from cross-listed courses. These 10 cross-listed units will count towards both degrees as long as the student enrolls in the GSB listing and in their GSB career in Axess. Students who enroll in cross-listed courses which add up to more than 10 units should indicate their plan to count up to 10 units of their cross-listed courses on their Master’s Program Proposal form.

It is imperative that students pay close attention and register for courses under the correct career:

  • Students should register for courses counting toward the MA under the Grad career and courses counting toward the MBA under the GSB career. 
  • Students wishing to count up to 10 cross-listed units toward the MA and MBA degrees must register for them under the GSB course number in the GSB career.

2019-20 Cross-Listed Courses

Autumn

Winter

Spring

Advising and Plan of Study

Beginning in their first year, students are expected to discuss a coherent program of study with Co-Directors Geoff Cox (gcox@stanford.edu) and Emi Kuboyama (kuboyama@stanford.edu), and must complete their Preliminary Program Proposal during the Autumn quarter of their second year of study. The Preliminary Program Proposal is due no later than the end of the second week of Autumn Quarter of the second year at 5pm. Students may deviate from their Preliminary Program Proposal during the academic year, but must be careful to fulfill all requirements. The Final Program Proposal, indicating courses actually taken, is due no later than the end of the second week of Spring Quarter of the second year at 5pm. 

Internships and Directed Reading (4 unit maximum)

Students may take up to 4 units of independent study (including EDUC 380 "Internship;" EDUC 180 "Directed Reading;" and EDUC 190 "Directed Research) from the Graduate School of Education which may be applied towards the 35 units needed for the MA in Education. Students interested in an internship during the academic year should consult the EdCareers database for opportunities and meet with Co-Director Geoff Cox to discuss the process for earning internship units. Students who wish to pursue internships in education over the summer can apply for funding to the Stanford Management Internship Fund at the GSB. Internships may be paid, unpaid, or be funded by a stipend. Students may not receive funding and academic credit for the exact same work. For more information about internship guidelines, please see: https://ed.stanford.edu/careers/connected/internships

2019-20 MA/MBA Course Requirements

Students are required to enroll in EDUC 393: Proseminar: Education, Business, Politics in the Winter Quarter of their first year.

Joint Degree with the Public Policy Program (MA/MPP)

Program Requirements

The Joint Degree with the Public Policy Program is intended for POLS MA students who are interested in education policy and working in educational agencies to develop both their analytic skills and perspectives of policy analysis and their substantive knowledge base regarding education policy, organizations, and practice. The joint degree requires approximately 2 years (6 quarters) to complete. Students in the joint degree program spend most of their first year taking both GSE and Public Policy courses and completing their POLS Field Placement and Project. The second year is typically devoted to the MPP practicum and remaining GSE and Public Policy requirements.

Students must complete at least 95 units at Stanford to receive the MA/MPP Joint Degree. The following constraints are placed on those 95 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA.
  • At least 48 units must be at or above the 200 level, of which, 23+ units must count toward POLS (EDUC 180 and 190 count toward this requirement).
  • At least 27 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units).
  • At least 65 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit), of which, 15+ units must count toward POLS
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the joint degree.
  • Students must enroll in a minimum of 8 units during Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters, and cannot exceed 18 units in any quarter.
  • No more than 40 units may be counted towards both degrees.
  • ​English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.
  • See the "Coterminal Degree" section for unit requirements applying to students admitted through the coterminal degree program.

Advising and Plan of Study

Beginning in their first year, students are expected to discuss a coherent program of study with Co-Directors Geoff Cox (gcox@stanford.edu) and Emi Kuboyama (kuboyama@stanford.edu) and must complete their Preliminary Program Proposal during the Autumn quarter of their second year of study. The Preliminary Program Proposal is due no later than the end of the second week of Autumn Quarter of the second year at 5pm. Students may deviate from their Preliminary Program Proposal during the academic year, but must be careful to fulfill all requirements. The Final Program Proposal, indicating courses actually taken, is due no later than the end of the second week of Spring Quarter of the second year at 5pm. 

For further information on course requirements, please visit the POLS page of the MA Handbook.

Joint Degree with the Stanford Law School (MA/JD)

Program Requirements

The following section pertains to the Graduate School of Education's requirements for the MA portion of the MA/JD joint degree. In addition to the following guidelines, students should consult the academic requirements specified by the Stanford Law School (SLS) for the JD portion of the joint degree and the Stanford Bulletin.

Students are strongly encouraged to begin courses for the joint degree program at SLS and must be enrolled full time in SLS for the first year of law school. After that time, enrollment may be in either school or both simultaneously as long as students maintain full-time status.

Faculty advisors from each academic unit will participate in the planning and supervising of the student's joint program of study. The proposed program of study, also known as the Program Proposal, must be established by the end of the first quarter in which the students begin to take Graduate School of Education courses.

Students must complete at least 45 units of instruction at Stanford for the MA portion of their MA/JD joint degree. The following constraints are placed on those 45 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 23 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 or 190 count toward this requirement).
  • No more than 40 quarter units may be counted toward both degrees as follows:
    • Up to 9 quarter units of SLS courses may count as part of the MA.
    • Up to 31 quarter units of Graduate School of Education courses may count as part of the JD. (See the list of pre-approved cross-creditable course below. In addition, all required/core courses and the inquiry courses are cross-creditable.) Please note that any SLS units of directed research, directed writing, externship, moot court, practicum, senior thesis, or research track reduce the number of non-law units on a one-for-one basis.
  • At least 15 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the master's degree.
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.
  • In rare cases, students may be permitted to petition course requirements (NOT unit requirements). To petition course requirements, students must contact the Faculty Director of the program, Professor Bill Koski, and provide approval of the petition to the MA Programs Officer at the Graduate School of Education.
  • Rules concerning pass-fail courses, independent study, grade point average, and so forth, will match those set for students in the Law program, and in the Graduate School of Education's MA Student Handbook in the year of matriculation in the joint degree program.

Courses

Please consult ExploreCourses and Axess for the most updated course offering and scheduling information.

Core

3 courses required. The following courses satisfy this area.

Required

Choose one

Choose one

Inquiry

Students are strongly encouraged to take a course in inquiry in education. The following courses satisfy this area:

Pre-Approved Cross-Creditable Courses

Core and inquiry courses (see above) may count as cross-creditable courses towards both MA and JD degrees within the constraints mentioned under Program Requirements above. In addition, several courses at the Graduate School of Education may count towards both degrees. These courses are:

Other activities for elective credit

Each of the following activities requires pre-approval from the Director of the MA/JD program:

  • A practicum or field-based internship
  • Directed reading tied to a Graduate School of Education research project
  • Other directed reading

Learning, Design and Technology (LDT)

Program Requirements

Students must complete at least 45 units at Stanford to receive the Master's degree in LDT. The following constraints are placed on those 45 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level. Courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 23 units (half of the total minimum units) must be at or above the 200 level. EDUC 180 or 190 count toward this requirement.
  • At least 30 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units).
  • At least 15 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the master's degree.
  • All students must enroll in a minimum of 8 units during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters, and cannot exceed 18 units in any quarter.
  • LDT students are required to register for exactly 6 units in the Summer quarter. The remaining 39 units need to be completed in Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters. 
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.
  • See the “Coterminal Degree” section for unit requirements applying to students admitted through the coterminal degree program.
  • Honors Cooperative Program (HCP) students: The application process is the same as regular applicant; simply check "yes" indicating you are applying as an HCP applicant on the application. Please note that the program does not have a distance-learning component. 

Required Courses

Note: All course information is subject to change.
Please consult ExploreCourses and Axess for final course offerings.

Internship

Students must register for a minimum of one unit of LDT Internship Workshop for at least two quarters during the year. A maximum of 9 internship units are accepted for the MA degree.

Electives

Recommended electives for LDT include a range of courses related to learners and education. Students may take electives from any department at Stanford, with advisor's approval. Also, students are encouraged to approach professors for Directed Reading, EDUC 180, on a topic of special interest to them.

ePortfolio and Master's Project

The ePortfolio consists of substantial works done during the year, together with a reflection on the work. The Master's Project consists of a design project conceived and developed by the student. The project proposal and reports will include a description and analysis of the learning problem, the theoretical approach and research used to address it, the design proposal, prototypes, and learning assessments. The Master's Project must be approved by the student's advisor by the end of winter quarter and presented to the public late in the summer. Both the ePortfolio and Master's Project Report are due in summer quarter.

2019-2020 List of Pre-Approved Courses

At least one course about evaluation and research methods used in Education. Pre-approved courses are listed below (3 units minimum).

Choose at least one.

LDT students have first enrollment priority in EDUC 200B in Autumn quarter and third enrollment priority in Winter quarter.   

At least one course in which students learn and apply a user-centered design process. Pre-approved courses are listed below (3 units minimum).

 

  • Any course with the CS 147, 247, or 347 prefix may count towards the Design Process requirement
  • Any course with the CS 377 prefix (e.g., CS 377U) may count towards the Design Process requirement.
  • Any full d.school course may be used to count towards the Design Process requirement.
  • Any "Design of Learning Experiences" course (listed below) can instead be used to count towards the Design Process requirement.

Two courses minimum. At least one course must cover theories of learning. Pre-approved courses are listed below (6 units minimum). Students are highly encouraged to take more than two of these courses.

Learning Theories

Learning Content

  • Other courses by petition. Courses in other departments may be appropriate for certain subjects.
  • Students who take EDUC 236 as a Learning Content course may count EDUC 211 toward their Design Process requirement (but not Design of Learning Experiences)

At least two courses applying user-centered design to a learning problem. Pre-approved courses are listed below (6 units minimum). Students are highly encouraged to take more than two of these courses.

Note: to qualify for this requirement, the following two courses must be taken together. EDUC 211: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (CS 402L) and EDUC 236: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (CS 402)

Policy, Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)

Program Requirements

Students must complete at least 45 units at Stanford to receive the Master's degree in POLS. The following constraints are placed on those 45 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 23 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 or 190 count toward this requirement).
  • At least 27 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units). 
  • At least 15 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained across all courses applied to the Master's degree.
  • Students must enroll in a minimum of 11 units and a maximum of 18 units each quarter of the POLS program (Autumn-Spring).
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the Master's degree.
  • See the "Coterminal Degree" section for unit requirements applying to students admitted through the coterminal degree program.

2019-2020 POLS Field Placement & Project

Each POLS student will be placed with and will work with an organization for approximately 150 hours over the Winter and Spring quarters.  Your field project will culminate in a defined “deliverable” by the end of the Spring quarter. The deliverable can be a research report, a policy paper, a business plan, a curriculum, or other output that effectively demonstrates your accomplishment while also bringing tangible value to the site. You will present a synthetic summary of your deliverable in a public conference at the end of the academic year.  

During POLS seminar, groups of students will have the opportunity to meet with advanced doctoral student mentors to ask questions and troubleshoot issues related to their field placement.

2019-2020 POLS Course Requirements

POLS Seminar (EDUC 209A & EDUC 209B)

The POLS Seminar is a required course that all POLS students take in Autumn and Winter quarters.

POLS Workshop (EDUC 210)

The POLS Workshop is a required course that all POLS students take in Winter and Spring quarters. Staffed by GSE faculty and advanced doctoral students, EDUC 210 provides support for the POLS Field Project.

Methods Requirement 

  • Two methods courses selected from the list below are required.
  • These courses may not be waived. Students with prior experience may enroll in more advanced coursework to satisfy this requirement.

Standard: Basic Research Literacy

Quant Focus I: Math background but no statistics

Quant Focus II: Math background, basis stats

High End Quant Focus: Comfortable with regression & calculus

Math Light

Other Methodology Courses

Individually Designed Master’s for Current Stanford Doctoral Students

The Individually Designed M.A. in Education is intended for doctoral students at Stanford who would like to earn a Master of Arts in Education while studying for their Ph.D. outside of the Graduate School of Education. The program is based on an individual program of study developed in consultation with the student’s GSE advisor and must be finished in 3 years.

Program Requirements

Students must complete at least 45 units at Stanford to receive the Individually Designed Master’s degree in Education. The following constraints are placed on those 45 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count toward the MA degree.
  • At least 23 units must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 and 190 count toward this requirement).
  • At least 27 units must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units).
  • At least 15 units must be taken for a letter grade (as opposed to Credit/No Credit).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses to applied to the master’s degree.
  • English for Foreign Students (EFSLANG 600 level) and Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (ATHLETIC) courses cannot be applied towards the master's degree.

Prospective students must submit the following for consideration into the program:

Coursework Planning

Students are expected, in their selection of GSE courses, to present a coherent, individualized program of study, pursuing a specific topic (e.g., education reform).

The Associate Dean for Student Affairs will appoint a program advisor for the student. The advisor will develop the final program proposal in consultation with the student and subject to the approval of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.

Registration

Axess - Student Portal

https://axess.stanford.edu

Axess is the Stanford University administrative system wherein most student business is conducted. Students may use Axess in order to:

  • Add/Drop/Update/Confirm course enrollment
  • Evaluate classes
  • Review grades and request official transcripts
  • Check registration status and any holds on account
  • Apply for on-campus housing
  • Verify subplan and view official advisor
  • Update contact information
  • View/Pay University bill with Stanford ePay
  • Review and accept financial aid offers (such asloans)
  • Apply to graduate

Enrolling in Classes

Students at Stanford use Axess to add/drop/update course enrollment (also known as filing or adjusting a study list). Registration deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar and on Axess.

The first day of the quarter is the preliminary study list deadline. The Office of the Registrar requires students to be “at-status” at this time. This means graduate students should be enrolled in at least 8 units by the deadline in order to avoid the late study list fee of $200. Students anticipating a stipend or financial aid refund on the first day of the term should be at-status by the preliminary study list deadline posted in the Academic Calendar. Students have until the final study list deadline of each quarter to add/drop courses and adjust units on variable unit classes.

To Register for an Independent Study Course

To enroll in Directed Reading (EDUC 180) or Directed Research (EDUC 190), students should approach the faculty member they want to work with and propose a list of readings and/or papers they would like to study that quarter. If the faculty member agrees to supervise the independent study, the student and faculty member will work to determine the appropriate number of units and grading basis. Once all of this information is finalized, the student can enroll accordingly in Axess.

Course Assignments and Schedules

After officially enrolling in courses via Axess, students should check Coursework (http://coursework.stanford.edu) and Blackboard (http://bb8.stanford.edu) to see if the courses have websites with advance course information. Professors may post assignments, announcements, and reading materials on these websites.

For a list of Stanford course offerings and course scheduling information, visit Explore Courses at http://explorecourses.stanford.edu. The Course Management Specialist maintains an electronic Visual Time Schedule available for students interested viewing all GSE courses by day/time, which is updated regularly and can be found here. In addition, many Stanford course syllabi are available to students on https://syllabus.stanford.edu.

Full-Time Study

Master’s students are required by the University and the Graduate School of Education to register for and attend classes full-time during the academic year (Autumn – Spring). All students must register in at least 11 units each quarter (except Summer) unless noted otherwise .

The only exceptions to the above full-time policy are for the Honors Cooperative Program in LDT and accommodations approved by the Office of Accessible Education.

International students with F1 or J1 visas are required to maintain full-time student status (contact Bechtel International Center for assistance). Full-time student status is also required for the receipt or deferment of many student loans. This includes registering in at least 6 units in the summer quarter.

Assistantships

Students who identify and wish to accept research or teaching assistantships (that are greater than 25% time; i.e., 10 hours/week) must obtain prior approval from the GSE's Academic Services Office. Requests for those exceptions are made first to the Program Director and then must be approved by the MA Programs Officer.

Leave of Absence

Students considering taking a leave of absence for one or more quarters should first discuss the matter with the MA Programs Officer and their advisor and/or Program Director. If a valid reason exists and the Program Director and advisor support the decision, the student must file a Leave of Absence Form and apply within the University’s established deadlines. The Associate Dean of Student Affairs reviews and approves or denies leave requests. International students must also obtain approval from Bechtel International Center, and must maintain appropriate visa status at all times.

The maximum length of any leave is one year. In rare cases, a leave may be extended beyond one year. The total number of leave quarters may not exceed six. A leave of absence does not extend the three-year candidacy period. For students who are requesting a medical leave, the policies may differ slightly. Contact the Office of Accessible Education for further information.

Any student who fails to register Autumn through Spring and does not secure an approved leave of absence will be discontinued per university policy. If a student later wishes to resume study, he or she must file an Application for Reinstatement through the MA Programs Officer.

Graduation Quarter

Registration is required for the term in which a student submits a thesis or has a degree conferred. Students who meet the following conditions are eligible to be assessed a special reduced tuition rate for the quarter in which they are receiving a degree:

  • All course work and residency requirements have been completed.
  • The student must have enrolled in the term immediately prior to the term chosen as the graduation quarter - summer quarter included.
  • The student has formally applied to graduate.
  • The student has only to submit the dissertation or thesis or project by the deadline for submission in the term designated as the graduation quarter.
  • The student has filed all necessary forms regarding graduation quarter before the first day of the term chosen as graduation quarter.

Students on graduation quarter are registered at Stanford and, therefore, have the rights and privileges of registered students. Only one graduation quarter may be requested for each degree program. There is a registration fee of $100 for the graduation quarter.

Students who do not complete all degree requirements by the end of the graduation quarter must re-register or apply for a leave of absence, provided their candidacy has not expired. Students must submit the Application for Extension of Candidacy or Master’s Program before their program expires in order to avoid having to apply for reinstatement. The form is available online at http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/registrar/forms/grad.

Extended Study

Master’s students are required to complete their degree within one year (either three or four quarters as stipulated by the individual program). Students who need more time beyond their first year must submit an Extension of Study Application for Master’s Students with the Graduate School of Education. Extensions may be granted in extreme and unique circumstances and for a maximum of one year. Students with an approved Extension of Study must maintain valid student status by registering according to University policy. 

Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR)

Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR) is a reduced tuition category for students who have completed all courses for their degree and are only finishing a dissertation, thesis, or final project, or who have completed all degree requirements and simply need to be registered in order to confer their degree. Requests for TGR status may be made for upcoming or future, but not prior, quarters. Students with TGR status must register for the TGR Project, EDUC 801 under their advisor’s name as the instructor (this course requires no additional work). If students register for additional courses, they must then pay the unit tuition rate in addition to the TGR tuition rate.

TGR registration status requests are reviewed and either granted or rejected by the MA Programs Officer. TGR Forms must be submitted no later than the first day of the quarter in which TGR status is requested.

Registration Holds

Offices throughout the University can place holds on a student’s record for various reasons, such as unpaid bills and overdue library fees, these holds prevent a student from registering. The Graduate School of Education places academic holds for reasons including: (1) the student completes less than six units in a quarter (considered minimal progress), (2) the student does not register in the required number of units, (3) the student does not submit the Master’s Program Proposal or other required forms by the stated deadlines, or (4) the student’s master’s program three-year time limit has expired and the student has not had an extension approved.

A notice will appear on Axess informing students of any holds and the contact information for the office that placed the hold. If the MA Programs Officer places a hold for any of the academic reasons, she will promptly notify the student by email. It is students’ responsibility to contact the office that placed the hold and take the necessary action to have it removed. If a hold prevents a student from registering for classes by the deadline, the Registrar will discontinue the student from the degree program and the student must apply for reinstatement to the program. It is therefore imperative that students take the necessary steps to remove any enrollment holds expeditiously.

Reinstatement

Discontinued students wishing to reinstate should first consult with the MA Programs Officer. If the student decides to petition, they must complete an Application for Reinstatement, available online at http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/registrar/forms/grad, and pay the reinstatement fees by check. Students submit the form and check to the MA Programs Officer at the Graduate School of Education. The Associate Dean of Student Affairs, in consultation with the Program Director and the Area Chair, makes the decision to approve or deny reinstatement. The School is not obligated to grant reinstatement.

Termination of Student Status

Each student is admitted to the master’s program in the Graduate School of Education with the expectation that he or she will receive the degree. However, the faculty has the right and obligation to terminate the student status of anyone whose academic performance or progress is deemed unsatisfactory. Before considering dismissal, the faculty will meet with the student to discuss his or her situation and how to correct deficiencies.

A faculty decision to terminate student status may be made as result of inadequate academic progress or unethical professional conduct. The advisor, the Program Director, and other faculty will meet with the student before considering termination. A written summary of these discussions shall be sent to the student and the advisor and added to the student’s academic file. The summary will specify the deficiencies, the steps necessary to correct them, and the period of time that is allowed for their correction (warning period), which is normally a minimum of one academic quarter. At the end of the warning period, the student’s progress will be reviewed and the student will be notified of the proposed action. A final decision is made and the student will be notified in writing of his or her final status with the program by the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.

Disputes or Grievances

In the case of disputes or grievances about any aspect of these guidelines or the programs in general, the case is to be brought to the attention of the Assistant Dean of Academic Services and will be first investigated by her confidentially. If any party deems it necessary, the issue may be brought to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs for consideration. A student may appeal directly to the Dean if a satisfactory resolution is not accomplished at the Assistant or Associate Dean’s level. The Assistant Dean of Academic Services and the Associate Dean of Student Affairs are available resources to students regarding grievances and disputes. Outside of the school, the University Ombuds person is available at (650) 723-3682 or http://www.stanford.edu/dept/ombuds/contact.html. Further grievance and dispute policy and procedures are described in the Stanford Bulletin.

Financial Support

The University Financial Aid Office handles federal and University loans. The Graduate School of Education's Academic Services office handles School tuition fellowships (offered at admission) and travel grants. Questions concerning student loans, loan deferments and other financial aid counseling can be addressed through the University's Graduate Financial Aid Office.

University Financial Aid Office
Montag Hall
355 Galvez Street
1-888 326-3773 or (650) 723-3058
financialaid@stanford.edu
http://www.stanford.edu/dept/finaid/grad

Graduate School of Education
Caroline Stasulat
Assistant Director of Degree Programs
485 Lasuen Mall, Cubberly 141
(650) 725-6448
​stasulat@stanford.edu

Eligibility to Receive Aid

All students receiving funding (loans, fellowships, etc.) must be registered full-time by the University's published quarterly deadlines in order for aid to be disbursed. This means all master's students should enroll in at least 8 units in Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters and 6 units in the Summer quarter in order to be eligible for aid in a given quarter (programs may require more units per quarter, see program requirements). If you intend to take a leave of absence, consult with your lender or the Financial Aid Office if you have loans, and with the Academic Services office to understand the implications of the leave on your financial award.

Outside Support

Students are encouraged to actively seek and apply for outside fellowships. Research and teaching assistantships in the Graduate School of Education are limited to doctoral students. However, students may arrange on their own for a research or teaching assistantship in another department at Stanford. Students should ensure that this outside work does not prevent them from keeping up with their program requirements. Students cannot reduce their full-time course load in order to work, except in the case of LDT students who enroll part-time through the Honors Co-op Program.

Paid Internships

Internships may be for pay or course credit, but not both for the same work. Programs that require students to complete an internship may provide additional possibilities for paid opportunities. See the Stanford EdCareers section for further details.

Additional Work

Graduate School of Education students may work for pay as "casual labor" at Stanford for up to eight hours a week, provided it does not adversely impact their academic program.

Travel Fellowships

The School provides travel fellowships to master's students for professional development opportunities. The fellowships are awarded for travel associated with paper presentations at conferences during the student's academic program at the Graduate School of Education. This program cannot support data-gathering expenses or travel expenses not associated with a conference presentation. The maximum award is $300 and students are limited to one travel fellowship per year. Students must provide proof of their participation in a conference and must be registered in the quarter in which funds are awarded. The Travel Fellowship Request Form is available here.

Funding Resources

The References Desk in Cubberley Library holds several guides and directories of fellowships and grants in Education. The Office of Academic Services also maintains an online page that lists funding resources for graduate studies in education.

Cardinal Care and Health Insurance Subsidy

Cardinal Care is an annual enrollment insurance plan which includes coverage in summer quarter, whether the student is enrolled that quarter or not. The annual cost of this coverage will be charged over three quarters of the academic year (Autumn, Winter and Spring). Students enrolled in Cardinal Care will be covered during leaves of absence, breaks, and quarters in which they are not registered. The insurance carrier, Health Net of California, will provide the medical benefits and Value Options will administer the mental health benefits.

Enrollment in Cardinal Care is a once-a-year event. In their first registered quarter of the academic year, students will decide whether or not to waive Cardinal Care coverage for that year. International students will be required to enroll in Cardinal Care, but may request an exception if they have an insurance plan with benefits that meet or exceed minimum standards set by the university.

The annual unsubsidized cost of the full Cardinal Care insurance premium for 2018-19, if enrollment begins in Autumn quarter, is $5,208 for single coverage. Stanford University will automatically pay a health insurance subsidy that covers part of the Cardinal Care premium for students who fall into one of categories below and who do not waive Cardinal Care coverage online via Axess.

Health insurance subsidy eligibility and amounts are determined by the criteria below:

  • 50% subsidy for those with a Research or Teaching Assistantship appointment of 25% (10 hours per week) or more or those with a fellowship paying a non-tuition stipend at or above the minimum salary for a 25% assistantship (CA or RA). For 2018-2019, the minimum dollar amount of non-tuition support to qualify for the 50% subsidy is $5,073 per quarter.
  • 25% subsidy for those with a Research or Teaching Assistantship appointment of less than 25% or those with a fellowship paying a non-tuition stipend at or above the minimum salary for a 10% assistantship (CA or RA). For 2018-2019, the minimum dollar amount of non-tuition support to qualify for the 25% subsidy is $2,029.20 per quarter.

For more information please visit the Vaden Health Center website.

Emergency and Additional Support Funding

Financial Aid Office Stanford Support Programs

The Financial Aid Office has limited funds available to help graduate students dealing with challenging financial situations. These currently include the Family Grant Program, Emergency Grant-in-Aid Funds, the Graduate Student Aid Fund, and Graduate Housing Loans.  Please see below for details.

Graduate Family Grant Program

As announced by Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs Patti Gumport in June 2018, Stanford has created a need-based Graduate Family Grant program, and funding has been approved for the 2019-20 academic year.  The Family Grant will provide up to $10,000 per year for graduate students with dependent children. Funds may be used flexibly to cover expenses such as childcare, healthcare, and rent.  Please review the program guidelines before completing the application.

Emergency Grant-In-Aid Funds

Emergency Grant-in-Aid Funds assist graduate students who experience a financial emergency or unanticipated expenses (e.g., medical or dental) causing financial hardship. This program is designed to assist those who cannot reasonably resolve their financial difficulty through fellowships or loans.  Please note that students at the Graduate School of Business, Law School, and Medical School (MD program) are not eligible for this program; these students should contact their respective financial aid offices for assistance. For more detailed information and application procedures please refer to the Emergency Grant-In-Aid instructions and application form.

Graduate Student Aid Fund

The Graduate Student Aid Fund has been established to assist a limited number of graduate students with University fees such as the Campus Health Service Fee and Cardinal Care Insurance when those fees cause a significant hardship.  Students who demonstrate need will be eligible for small amounts to cover specific charges.  Please note that students at the Graduate School of Business, Law School, and Medical School (MD program) are not eligible for this program; these students should contact their respective financial aid offices for assistance. For more detailed information and application procedures please refer to the Graduate Student Aid Fund instructions and application form.

Graduate Housing Loan

Graduate and professional students may apply for loan funds from the University to help with move-in costs for off-campus housing, such as first and last month's rent and security deposit. Details on eligibility, loan terms, and application process are available at Graduate Housing Loan.

GSE Student Emergency Funding Program

The GSE Student Emergency Funding Program assists graduate students who experience a financial emergency or unanticipated expenses* causing financial hardship. This program is designed to assist those who cannot reasonably resolve their financial difficulty through fellowships, loans or personal resources

Emergency funding provides grants that reimburse actual expenses. These awards are not a loan, and do not need to be repaid. Emergency funds awarded are tax-reportable income.

Eligible expenses: Unanticipated or unusual expenses (most commonly medical, dental, or legal, but other expenses can be considered) outside of the standard student budget outlined by the University that may hinder the student’s academic progress will be considered.  Costs must have been incurred while enrolled at Stanford, and costs for a previous or future academic year will not be considered.  Each case is considered on its own merits.

*Emergency funding is not intended for tuition or fees, standard living expenses, research-related expenses, travel to and from internship/practicum/research sites and conferences, or when other aid has ceased.

Limit:  up to $2,000 per academic year

Process: Student submits an emergency grant-in-aid application to the Stanford Financial Aid Office (FAO).  No separate application process is needed for the GSE.  The FAO Office makes the determination that the student is eligible for emergency funds.  FAO has a maximum amount of $5,000 per year.  The GSE emergency funds can supplement the need (up to $2,000) not already covered by the FAO. 

Stanford EdCareers

Overview of Resources and Services

At the Graduate School of Education and across the broader campus, there are numerous career exploration and support services available including faculty, program directors, alumni, and Stanford EdCareers, the Stanford Graduate School of Education's career resources unit. The ConnectED unit of Stanford EdCareers engages students and alumni in lifelong career exploration by connecting with the larger Stanford and education communities to create innovative learning opportunities that help individuals realize their personal career visions. 

Graduate School of Education students and alumni from all graduate programs have access to several career development resources.  These resources include:

EdCareers Database

Stanford EdCareers provides Graduate School of Education students and alumni a variety of comprehensive free resources through their EdCareers Database. All students are automatically granted access to the EdCareers Database during the summer prior to arrival on campus. To log in, go to http://edcareers.stanford.edu. This system facilitates:

  • Accessing employer profiles and job openings
  • Managing internships, fellowship, part-time, consulting, and career opportunities
  • Submitting a resume for prospective employer review
  • Viewing upcoming EdCareers events and programs
  • Making appointments for career coaching sessions
  • Networking with employers

Individualized Career Counseling

EdCareers' Executive Director Nereyda Salinas and Associate Director Jennifer Mason are both available to meet with GSE students to discuss their immediate career goals and facilitate their lifelong career management process.  Career coaching appointments may be scheduled through the Stanford EdCareers Database. 

Other resources provided by the Stanford community include:

Internships

Internships are intended to give professional experience to help bridge to a new career upon graduation.  Students whose programs require an internship or practicum may potentially work off-campus in paid or unpaid internships, up to 10 hours per week, during the academic year. The role of the internship varies within each of the master's programs at the Graduate School of Education. A student's Program Director is most often the person who supervises internship units, although other faculty members may be appropriate.

Contact Information

Academic Services & Administration

Academic Services

Assistant Dean of Academic Services
Shu-Ling Chen
Education 110
650-723-4066
shulingchen@stanford.edu

Assistant Director of Degree Programs
Caroline Stasulat
Barnum 136
650-725-6448
stasulat@stanford.edu

Assistant Director of Degree Programs
Tommy Liu
Barnum 132
650-725-1497
liutommy@stanford.edu

Assistant Director of Degree Programs
Kate McKinney
Barnum 136
650-736-2937
kbmckinney@stanford.edu

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid
Loida Feliz
Barnum 144
650-723-0555

loifeliz@stanford.edu

Admissions & Academic Services Officer
Wesley Horng
Barnum 146
650-725-7652
wjhorng@stanford.edu

Admissions & Community Engagement Officer
Kim McCabe
Barnum 146
650-723-2115
kgmccabe@stanford.edu

Executive Director, Stanford EdCareers
Nereyda Salinas
Education 111
650-721-9342
edcareers@stanford.edu

Administration

Dean, Graduate School of Education
Dan Schwarz
daniel.schwartz@stanford.edu

Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Shelley Goldman
sgoldman@stanford.edu

Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs
Shelley Goldman
sgoldman@stanford.edu

Head Librarian, Education Library
Kathy Kerns
kkerns@stanford.edu

Area Chair, CTE
Hilda Borko
hildab@stanford.edu

Area Chair, DAPS
Ayita Ruiz-Primo
aruiz@stanford.edu

Area Chair, SHIPS
Eric Bettinger
ebettinger@stanford.edu

Area Chair, LSTD
Roy Pea (Fall and Spring)
roypea@stanford.edu
Rebecca Silverman (Winter)
rdsilver@stanford.edu

Area Chair, RILE
Arnetha Ball
arnetha@stanford.edu

Master's Program Directors

Hilda Borko, CTE
650-728-4581
hildab@stanford.edu

Christine Min Wotipka, ICE/IEPA
650-736-1392
cwotipka@stanford.edu

Karin Forssell, LDT
650-723-3340
forssell@stanford.edu

William Koski, MA/JD
650-724-3718
bkoski@stanford.edu

Mitchell Stevens, Faculty Director, POLS, MA/MPP, MA/MBA
650-723-4536
mitchell.stevens@stanford.edu

Geoff Cox, Co-Director, POLS, MA/MPP, MA/MBA
650-723-4052
gcox@stanford.edu

Emi Kuboyama, Co-Director, POLS, MA/MPP, MA/MBA
650-724-3794
kuboyama@stanford.edu

Forms

To view the forms, click here.

Useful Links

Important Stanford Websites

Academic Calendar (includes quarterly Enrollment and Registration deadlines)
https://registrar.stanford.edu/resources-and-help/stanford-academic-calendar

GSE Listserves

Click here to view the list of emails.