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Cubberley Lecture Series

Reimagining the Profession of Teaching: Linda Darling-Hammond in conversation with Dana Goldstein and Elizabeth Green

May 7, 2015
Cubberley Auditorium

The teaching profession is under a national microscope. Society often dismisses it as low-status and undesirable, while critics target it as the source of all that’s failing in education. At the same time, gifted educators are thriving, transforming learning seemingly under the public radar. We need a new career ladder for the profession that reflects its essential role in shaping the future. What can we learn from other countries, our own history, and leading practitioners to help us attract, develop, and retain the best and brightest? 

About the Speakers

Dana Goldstein is a journalist and the author of the New York Times bestseller and notable book of 2014, The Teacher Wars:  A History of America's Most Embattled Profession.  She is a staff writer at The Marshall Project and contributor to Slate, The Atlantic, and other magazines.  Dana writes about education, social science, inequality, crimial justice, women's issues, cities, and public health. She has been a Spencer Foundation Fellow in education journalism, a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation, and a Puffin Foundation fellow at the Nation Institute.  She graduated from Brown University and attended 13 years of public school in Ossining, New York.

Elizabeth Green is co-founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief of Chalkbeat, a nonprofit news organization that covers educational change efforts across the country.  She is the author of the New York Times bestseller and notable book of 2015 How to Build a Better Teacher:  How Teaching Works (And How to Teach It to Everyone) and has written for the New York Times Magazine, The New York Sun, and U.S. News & World Report. She was an Abe Journalism Fellow studying education in Japan, and a Spencer Fellow in education journalism at Columbia University.  

Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun professor of education at Stanford, where she conducts research and policy analysis on issues affecting educational equity and opportunity, including curriculum, assessment, and teaching policy and practices. In 2006, Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation's ten most influential people affecting educational policy over the past decade, and in 2008, she served as the leader of President Barack Obama's education policy transition team. 

Video Highlights by Stanford Video

Photo Highlights by Steve Castillo