Skip to content Skip to navigation

Rebecca Zeigler Mano

Photo of Rebecca Zeigler Mano

Rebecca Zeigler Mano,
MA '92 Stanford Teacher Education Program

Changing lives in Zimbabwe

In 2000, Rebecca Zeigler Mano, MA ’92 STEP, took a job at the U.S. embassy in Harare, Zimbabwe, helping young people who wanted to go to college in the United States. They weren’t necessarily the top students, she noticed; they simply were the ones who had the money for college. Zeigler Mano couldn’t help but wonder about the talented youth in Zimbabwe’s poorer communities — students for whom a college education would be life-changing. 

Zeigler Mano has since spent 21 years identifying the brightest, most impoverished students in Zimbabwe and enabling them to study abroad. The United Student Achievers Program, which she founded, coaches students through the admissions process, helps secure financial aid, and eases their transition to college life. More than 500 USAP students have graduated from Duke, MIT, Stanford, and other schools in the United States and other countries; they’ve returned to Zimbabwe as software engineers, microfinance bankers, agronomists, and structural engineers — to name just a few professions — with the goal of helping further their country’s growth.

In 2016 Zeigler Mano expanded USAP into a broader nonprofit called Education Matters, and in 2020 she opened a residential school, recruiting talented 11th and 12th graders from throughout the country — including from a refugee camp — and offering them a pre-college curriculum. “These kids are so driven and so motivated,” Zeigler Mano says, adding that families in Zimbabwe place a high value on education. “Parents will sell their last cow if it means their kids can go to a better school.”

Zeigler Mano, who will receive the GSE’s 2021 Alumni Excellence in Education Award at a ceremony on October 24, is already hearing from educators in other countries who want to visit the new school — and she’s eager to share what she’s learned. “I really want to capture the vision,” she says, “so other people can use it.”


 

October 7, 2021
Photo courtesy of Rebecca Zeigler Mano

More Community stories

Photo of Alfredo Artiles
Alfredo J. Artiles, Professor
Investigating the dual nature of disability
Read this story
Photo of Irene Castillon
Irene Castillon, MA '10
Being a ‘college first responder’ 
Read this story
Photo of Facia Desmond at her school, standing near a sign that welcomes students and gives guidance about how to keep others safe during COVID
Fadia Desmond, MA '95 Stanford Teacher Education Program
Recognizing the value of adaptability
Read this story
Back to the Top