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From the Classroom to the Boardroom: Tackling Diversity in Engineering

Wednesday, February 17, 2021
5:00pm - 6:00pm
Zoom Meeting (link and instructions will be provided to all registrants via email on February 17)
Sheri Sheppard
Sheri Sheppard
anthony antonio, MS ’93
anthony antonio, MS ’93

With a world population closing in on 8 billion people, engineering is positioned to play a major role in addressing the innumerable challenges that impact all aspects of our lives. Yet engineers make up less than 1% of the adult workforce in the U.S. The number of women getting engineering degrees, while still small, is growing. Black engineers, among other groups, remain woefully underrepresented on campuses, in labs, and in industry.

In an event focused on diversifying engineering education, Stanford adjunct lecturer Anthony Kinslow II (MS ’15, PhD ’19) will moderate a conversation with mechanical engineer Sheri Sheppard, the Richard W. Weiland Professor in the Stanford School of Engineering, and anthony antonio (MS ’93), associate professor in the Stanford Graduate School of Education.

In this discussion, Sheppard and antonio will explore issues of access to the field of engineering from high school to college and beyond. They will share research on changes needed in how engineering is taught, how it is implemented in the field, and how society benefits. 

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A Zoom link and instructions will be provided to all registrants via email on February 17. For a more engaging and "live" feel, this event will be hosted in "meeting" format. Note that registration will close on February 16 at 11:59 pm PST. This event will be closed captioned and recorded.

Submit your questions for the panelists ahead of the event using this google form or email it to engineering-alumni@stanford.edu.

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Sheri Sheppard teaches design-related courses for undergraduates and graduate students, and conducts research on fracture mechanics and applied finite element analysis, and on how people become engineers. From 1999 to 2008 she served as a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, leading the foundation’s engineering study. In addition to publishing technical papers, reports, and textbooks, she has led or co-led several large, multi-institutional projects to build new educational research programs and related resources, such as the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE), the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter), and a program on summer research experiences for high school teachers. At Stanford she has served as chair of the Faculty Senate and as associate vice provost for graduate education. She is the longtime faculty founder of and adviser to the graduate student group MEwomen. Her work has been recognized with numerous honors and awards, including the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford University’s highest award for excellence in teaching. She received the national Professor of the Year award from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2014.

anthony antonio, MS ’93, is an associate professor in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. His research focuses on equity issues in American higher education. As admission to institutions of higher education becomes more competitive and more acute, he seeks to achieve a better understanding of how college-going cultures are developed and maintained in schools. He is also interested in network approaches to conceptualizing and studying college student development, particularly among racial, ethnic, and religious minorities. His current projects also include studies of engineering education.

Anthony Kinslow II, MS ’15, PhD ’19, is the founder of Gemini Solutions, an energy-efficiency technology and consulting company. As a Stanford lecturer, he teaches about racial equity in energy and on equity in financial access to clean energy solutions. His PhD focused on remotely targeting households for energy-efficiency measures. He was advised in his work by Professor Martin Fischer.

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