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Ari Y. Kelman

Photo of Ari Y. Kelman

Ari Y. Kelman

Associate Professor

aykelman@stanford.edu

- Webpage

Assistant: Elayne Weissler-Martello

Office: Littlefield 378

Biography

Professor Kelman's research focuses on the forms and practices of religious knowledge transmission. He holds a specific research interest in American Jewry.

He is the author of Shout to the Lord: Making Worship Music in Evangelical America (NYU 2018) and Station Identification: A Cultural History of Yiddish Radio (California, 2009). He is also the co-editor (with Jon Levisohn) of Beyond Jewish Identity (2019: Academic Studies Press), the editor of Is Diss a System?: A Milt Gross Comic Reader (NYU, 2010), co-author of Sacred Strategies: Transforming Synagogues from Functional to Visionary (Alban Institute, 2011). Together with research partners at Stanford and elsewhere, he maintains an active research agenda and publishes regularly in venues both scholarly and popular.

Other Titles

Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education
Associate Professor (By courtesy), Religious Studies

Program Affiliations

Learning Sciences and Technology Design (LSTD)
Race, Inequality, and Language in Education (RILE)
SHIPS (PhD): Anthropology of Education
SHIPS (PhD): History of Education
SHIPS (PhD): Social Sciences in Education
SHIPS (PhD): Sociology of Education
(MS) LDT
Education and Jewish Studies

Research Interests

Recent Publications

Kelman, A. Y. (2024). Jewish Education. JEWISH EDUCATION, 1–193.

Kelman, A. Y., Yares, L., & Kober, H. Z. (2024). Jewish Education. Oxford University Press. Retrieved from https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/display/document/obo-9780199840731/obo-9780199840731-0248.xml?rskey=4cxL43&result=1&q=Jewish+education#firstMatch

Kelman, A. Y., Horwitz, I. M., & Ahmed, A. (2023). The Other Dual Curriculum: Jewish Community High School Students' Reflections on What Counts as "Jewish" Learning. JOURNAL OF JEWISH EDUCATION.

Ari Y. Kelman in the News & Media

GSE faculty members Ari Kelman, Emily Levine, and Mitchell Stevens argue that universities can engender renewed public trust by acknowledging errors of the past.
October 12, 2022
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