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Dan Schwartz

Photo of Daniel Schwartz

Daniel Schwartz

I. James Quillen Dean

Daniel.Schwartz@stanford.edu

http://AAALab.Stanford.Edu

Assistant: Amy Schaumburg

Office: Galvez Modular 129

Biography

Daniel L. Schwartz is the I. James Quillen Dean and Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology at Stanford Graduate School of Education. He leads the Stanford Accelerator for Learning, a major interdisciplinary initiative advancing the science and design of learning to bring effective and equitable solutions to the world. An expert in human learning and educational technology, Schwartz also oversees a laboratory that creates pedagogy, technology, and assessments that prepare students to continue learning and adapting throughout their lifetimes. He has taught math in rural Kenya, English in south-central Los Angeles and multiple subjects in Kaltag, Alaska. He is author of "The ABCs of How We Learn: 26 Scientifically Proven Approaches, How They Work, and When to Use Them."

Other Titles

Professor, Graduate School of Education
Member, Bio-X
Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)
Member, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance
Member, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

Program Affiliations

DAPS
Learning Sciences and Technology Design (LSTD)
(MS) EDS

Research Interests

Assessment, Testing and Measurement | Brain and Learning Sciences | Data Sciences | Psychology | Technology and Education

See a full list of GSE Faculty research interests >

Recent Publications

Kaeser, T., & Schwartz, D. L. (2020). Modeling and Analyzing Inquiry Strategies in Open-Ended Learning Environments. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN EDUCATION, 30(3), 504–535.

Cutumisu, M., Schwartz, D. L., & Lou, N. M. (2020). The relation between academic achievement and the spontaneous use of design-thinking strategies. COMPUTERS & EDUCATION, 149.

Cutumisu, M., Chin, D. B., & Schwartz, D. L. (2019). A digital game-based assessment of middle-school and college students' choices to seek critical feedback and to revise. BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, 50(6), 2977–3003.

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