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Milbrey McLaughlin

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Milbrey McLaughlin

Professor Emerita

milbrey@stanford.edu

Assistant: Elayne Weissler-Martello

Biography

Dr. McLaughlin's research combines studies of K-12 education policy in the U.S and work on the broad question of community-school collaboration to support youth development. Her research on public education focuses on how school teaching is shaped by "context" issues such as organizational policy, social-cultural conditions of the schools, districts and communities. Within communities, she is involved with local efforts engage whole communities-schools, community organizations and agencies, parents, faith-based institutions-in developing new strategies and capacity to promote youth development broadly considered. Dr. McLaughlin is Co-Director of the Center for Research on the Context of Teaching, an education research center that analyzes how teaching and learning are shaped by their contexts and the connection between teacher learning communities and educational reforms. She is Director of the John Gardner Center for Youth and their Communities, a partnership between Stanford University and Bay Area communities to build new practices, knowledge and capacity for youth development and learning.

Other Titles

David Jacks Professor of Higher Education, Emerita

Program Affiliations

SHIPS (PhD): International Comparative Education

Research Interests

Educational Policy | School Reform

See a full list of GSE Faculty research interests >

Recent Publications

London, R. A., Westrich, L., Stokes-Guinan, K., & McLaughlin, M. (2015). Playing Fair: The Contribution of High-Functioning Recess to Overall School Climate in Low-Income Elementary Schools. JOURNAL OF SCHOOL HEALTH, 85(1), 53–60.

Nasir, N. S., Jones, A., & McLaughlin, M. (2011). School Connectedness for Students in Low-Income Urban High Schools. TEACHERS COLLEGE RECORD, 113(8), 1755–93.

McLaughlin, M. W. (2011). Shifts in Reform Influence How and What Teachers Learn. PHI DELTA KAPPAN, 92(6), 67–67.

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