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Checking up on adolescent health—where teachers and doctors intersect

January 8, 2018
It takes a village—including teachers and doctors—to raise a healthy child. (Photo: FatCamera/Getty Images)
It takes a village—including teachers and doctors—to raise a healthy child. (Photo: FatCamera/Getty Images)
In this episode of School's In, Stanford pediatrics professor Neville Golden talks about the connection between the doctor’s office and the classroom.

The way a student shows up at school can tell a lot about his or her health, according to Stanford pediatrics professor Neville Golden.

“Not everyone attends school every day—and some are attending school and stressed out about it, not getting enough sleep because of the pressures,” he said on this episode of School’s In. “As a doctor, your role is to find out why.”

Golden joined GSE Dean Dan Schwartz and Senior Lecturer Denise Pope in the studio to talk about why he trains future doctors to ask about school during children’s routine office visits—and why health problems like eating disorders are on the rise among adolescents.

“We’re now recognizing that eating disorders are not confined to young, thin adolescent girls,” said Golden, who also serves as the chief of adolescent medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and director of the Adolescent Medicine Fellowship Training Program at Stanford. “We see eating disorders in boys and girls, in all socioeconomic groups, and in people of all sizes.”

Listen from the link below, and find more episodes of School's In at the Stanford Radio main page. The show airs Saturdays on SiriusXM Insight Channel 121.