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Lynne Zummo

Lynne Zummo

“I wanted to effect change in science education beyond the walls of my school. I knew that Stanford would be the mechanism by which I could do that.”
GSE Program: 
PhD program in Curriculum and Teacher Education (CTE)
Age: 
32 years old
Hometown: 
Simsbury, CT
Degree(s): 
BA, Middlebury College
MS, Earth Sciences – Dartmouth College
MA, Curriculum and Teacher Education, Stanford Graduate School of Education

What drew you to the field of education?

During college, I spent summers working in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, where I taught visitors about local alpine ecology and geology. Helping people to foster a connection to nature through teaching scientific concepts revealed to me the power of education.

What were you doing prior to applying to the GSE?

Prior to the GSE, I taught 9th grade Earth Systems Science in Washington, DC. While it was hard to give up my classroom when I moved to Stanford, I did it because I knew that I wanted to effect change in science education beyond the walls of my school. I knew that Stanford would be the mechanism by which I could do that.

Why Stanford?

Stanford offers a variety of incredible resources, but it is the brilliant, highly committed and involved faculty that make it an ideal place to grow as a researcher and leader in education.

What’s unusual about the CTE program?

CTE allows students to hone research skills while also providing situations to grow as a practitioner. Students become not only competent researchers, but also highly skilled educators.

How would you describe your classmates?

My classmates come from diverse backgrounds; I often feel as though everyone has their own unique perspective on education. My personal educational philosophy has grown and developed as I have collaborated with such an immense variety of people and perspectives.

Lynne Zummo

What do you do to relax and have fun outside of school?

I love to run, hike, read, and cook nice meals with friends.

What are your career plans?

I hope to eventually work in teacher education and to help prepare the next generations of effective, motivated, and well-supported science teachers.

What advice do you have for prospective students on the application process?

Devote serious time to your personal statement—it should reflect your personality, as well as your experience and goals. Have friends read it to ensure that it really reflects you, as a person.

Interview conducted August 2015