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Joint MA/MBA

The Joint MA/MBA program is a rigorous, full-time program that integrates a comprehensive set of MBA classes with Education coursework, resulting in a personalized, world-class educational management curriculum. You will spend most of your first year concentrating on the core MBA curriculum and enroll in the majority of your Education classes late in your first year and in your second year. Because of our small class sizes, we are able to form a community of scholars and practitioners that becomes invaluable to your professional and personal development. MBA students may pursue up to one degree in addition to the MBA, whether joint or dual, while in the Stanford GSB.

Program Requirements

As a Joint MA/MBA student you will be required to complete a minimum of 109 units of coursework — 84 GSB units and 35 EDUC units. Up to 10 of these units may be counted towards both the GSB and the EDUC unit requirements.

Students must successfully complete 35 units of instruction at the Graduate School of Education (EDUC units) for the MA portion of their joint degree. The following constraints are placed on those 35 units:

  • All courses must be at or above the 100 level – courses numbered below 100 do not count.
  • At least 18 units – or half the total minimum– must be at or above the 200 level (EDUC 180 and 190 can count toward this requirement).
  • A 3.0 GPA must be maintained for all courses applied to the MA degree.
  • No more than 10 cross-listed units may count toward both degrees.
  • At least 27 of the 35 units must be taken for a letter grade. That is, a maximum of 8 units (including independent study) can be taken for a Pass-Fail grade.
  • A maximum of 4 units of independent study/internship/directed reading from the Graduate School of Education may be applied toward the MA degree.
  • Doctoral seminars that do not require any written work from a student may not be applied toward the 35-unit Graduate School of Education requirement.
  • Students may not enroll in Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) courses.

In addition to the following guidelines, students should consult the academic requirements specified by the Graduate School of Business (GSB) for the MBA portion of the Joint MA/MBA. Please consult the online MA Handbook MA Handbook for the most up to date Program Requirement information.

GSB Joint Programs MA Handbook

Thematic Clusters

Students are required to take a minimum of two courses in each of the three thematic clusters of Knowledge, Theory, and Skills as they develop balanced perspectives on leadership in education. Below the description of the thematic clusters are lists of courses that satisfy each cluster requirement. Beyond the six required thematic cluster courses, MA/MBA students may take electives within the Graduate School of Education. For information on courses offered at Stanford University, please visit Explore Courses. For program requirements pertaining to the current cohort of students, please see the MA Handbook.

Knowledge - 2 courses minimum

Growing as a leader begins with an understanding of the purposes, policies, practices, and challenges of organizations focused on education. Leadership knowledge ranges from the relationships of schools and districts to local, state, and federal governments; to education technology entrepreneurship; to the evolving role of higher education in society. The well-prepared education leader has knowledge of the education landscape that is both broad and deep.

Theory - 2 courses minimum

Leaders need frameworks and perspectives that help them to understand the complex organizations they presume to lead. Learning theory helps the prospective leader to make sense of confusing situations, conflicting goals, and puzzling outcomes. Learning a broad range of theory related to leading education organizations allows students to develop a personalized framework for addressing complex challenges.

Skills - 2 courses minimum

Students apply their leadership knowledge and understanding of leadership theory in courses that focus on leadership skills. The MA/MBA program is enhanced by these opportunities to connect research and theory to practice. This cluster completes a well-rounded course of study focused on leading a wide range of education organizations.

Courses

Knowledge

 EDUC 212 Urban Education (A. Ball) (3-4) (PK12, NP, EP, ET)
For students who are interested in teaching or leading in urban school settings, this course takes social science and historical perspectives to look at the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
EDUC 213 Introduction to Teaching (H. Borko, E. Szu) (3-4) (PK12, NP, EP)
This introductory course is critically important to those aspiring to work in any pre-K - 12 related setting who have never actually taught. Students with teaching experience are also welcome. Key concepts and practical perspectives on teaching and learning are emphasized. 
EDUC 220D History of School Reform (D. Labaree) (3-5) (PK12, NP, EP, ET)
POLS students interested in pre-K - 12 are commonly focused on making change or addressing a problem in education. This course explains the context of past and present efforts to improve the quality of education and provides students an opportunity to test their own reform thinking against past experience. This course is foundational for students interested in PK-12 education. It provides a broad theoretical, historical, and sociological perspective on how the American school system works, treating historical efforts at school reform as experimental interventions that reveal the system's nature and functions.
EDUC 230 Learning Experience Design (K. Forssell) (3) (PK12, ET, HE)
This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. A Cardinal Course. In this course, students will use design activities to facilitate the creation of impactful learning experiences for learners different from themselves, while focusing on the possibilities presented by digital technologies.  Students will engage in a variety of design activities to come up with new learning tools for community partners. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution.
EDUC 265 History of Higher Education in the U.S. (D. Labaree) (3-5) (HE, EP)
This course emphasizes an understanding of contemporary configurations of higher education through studying its antecedents. EDUC 355 Higher Education & Society, and this course are strong complements for one another. This course is foundational for students interested in higher education. It provides a broad theoretical, historical, and sociological perspective on what is distinctive about the American system of higher education and how the system works. 
EDUC 337 Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (A. Ball) (3-5) (PK12)
Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
EDUC 460 Language, Culture, Cognition, and Assessment (G. Solano-Flores) (3) (PK12, EP)
Examines the intersection of language, culture, and cognition, and the implications of this intersection in educational assessment. Knowledge from different disciplines is used to reason about assessment from the conceptual, methodological, and social perspectives. 

Theory 

EDUC 204 Introduction to Philosophy of Education (E. Callan) (3) (PK12, HE, EP, ET)
How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.  
EDUC 249 Theory & Issues in Bilingualism (G. Valdes) (3-5) (PK12)
For those interested in working with bilingual students and their families and/or carrying out research in bilingual settings, this course emphasizes the typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, and the nature of societal bilingualism. 
EDUC 256 Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth (R. Lizcano, A. Padilla) (4) (PK12, EP)
This course is aimed at students interested in individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful resilience despite high levels of adversity exposure are emphasized. Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues are examined, including current technology and conceptual and measurement issues.
EDUC 275 Leading U.S. Schools (D. Brazer) (3-4) (PK12, EP, NP)
The landscape of schooling in the U.S. is dynamic and replete with ideologies, myths, and beliefs. Organizational theory, leadership theory, and empirical research are lenses through which students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of the similarities and differences among private schools, parochial schools, traditional K-12 schools, charter schools, and alternative schools. Students will connect theory and research to practice by visiting and learning about two or more schools of their choosing. 
EDUC 306D World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (F. Ramirez) (4-5) (PK12, HE, EP)
Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility and equality; international organizations, and world culture.
EDUC 333A Understanding Learning Environments (S. Goldman, R. McDermott, D. Stringer) (3) (PK12, EP, ET)
This course uses theoretical approaches to learning to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
EDUC 337 Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (A. Ball) (3-5) (PK12)
Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
EDUC 355 Higher Education and Society (M. Stevens) (3) (HE, EP)
For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
EDUC 414 Play and Games (D. McFarland) (3-4) (PK12, HE, EP, NP) 
Social life would be unimaginable without play and games. Students will be introduced to social theories of play and games; the history of games and their variation; readings concerned with how play and games affect interaction and socialization; how race and gender are enacted in and through play and games; how play and games relate to creativity and innovation; and how games can be designed for engrossment and the accomplishment of various tasks and learning goals. Course intended mainly for doctoral students, though master¿s and undergraduate students are welcome. This is a new course, so please expect collaboration with instructor and other students to shape the course content.
EDUC 417 Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (A. Antonio) (3) (HE, EP, NP) 
The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). 
PUBLPOL 307 Justice (R. Reich) (4-5) (PK12, HE, NP)
Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality.

Skills 

EDUC 200A Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation (A. Porteus) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
This course teaches students to read and critically interpret quantitative published research. The course is conceptual rather than formula driven.  It requires no advanced math or prior statistics.  It develops skills central to reading and understanding research.
EDUC 200B Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods (D. Pope, J. Wolf) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
Primarily for master's students: An introduction to the core concepts and methods of qualitative research. Through a variety of hands-on learning activities, readings, field experiences, class lectures, and discussions, students will explore the processes and products of qualitative inquiry. Course material and hands-on activities are likely to be directly applicable to the POLS Project/Talk.
EDUC 230 Learning Experience Design (K. Forssell) (3) (PK12, ET, HE)
This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. A Cardinal Course. In this course, students will use design activities to facilitate the creation of impactful learning experiences for learners different from themselves, while focusing on the possibilities presented by digital technologies.  Students will engage in a variety of design activities to come up with new learning tools for community partners. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution.
EDUC 242 Workshop on Instrument Development for Assessment, Research of Evaluation Purposes I (M. Ruiz-Primo) (3) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
This course is designed with the belief that collecting information is a routine activity in which most researchers and educators are involved. Developing and improving instruments to gather information for descriptive, assessment, research, or evaluation purposes is a goal that unites all social sciences. Therefore, this course focuses on the technical skills required to develop, judge, and/or select quality instruments in diverse domains. The course will focus on your personal journey to develop or judge an instrument on something that is important for you.
EDUC 281 Technology for Learners (K. Forssell) (3-4) (ET)
For those interested in the use of technology in education and how it may be used to improve learning. This course explores how technology may help make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners and considers a variety of different approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Topics include feedback, visualization, games, multimedia, tangible-digital interfaces, simulations, and more. Students will work on teams to identify a need, create a prototype, and design tests to understand its impact. Space is limited.
PSYCH 147 Development in Early Childhood (M. Peters, B. Wise) (3-5) (PK12, NP)
Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.

Knowledge 

EDUC 221A Policy Analysis in Education (C. Mercer) (PK12, HE, EP)
Major concepts associated with the development, enactment, and execution of educational policy. Issues of policy implementation, agenda setting and problem formulation, politics, and intergovernmental relations. Case studies. Goal is to identify factors that affect how analysts and policy makers learn about and influence education.
EDUC 250 What Do Students Really Know? The Risks of Modern Assessment (M. Ruiz-Primo) (3) (PK12 EP)
This course focuses on helping students to advance their knowledge about theory, design and research issues related to assessing student learning for accountability and learning purposes. The course explores assessment topics with a critical perspective in two contexts: large-scale and classroom assessment. The course will help students become critical test consumers, better-informed assessment evaluators, and advocator of reliable, valid and fair assessments for culturally and linguistically diverse populations.
EDUC 306A Economics of Education in the Global Economy (M. Carnoy) (5) (PK12, EP) 
In today's educational policy environment, a working knowledge of the economics of education is fundamental for anyone involved in educational policy and educational practice. Education 306A is a survey course, covering issues from the relation of schooling, to economic outcomes, to the analysis of how schooling and students' family backgrounds influence student performance in schools, to analyses of teacher labor markets (including issues such as teacher incentive pay). The course also covers education "markets" and discusses educational finance at the K-12 and university levels.
EDUC 346 Research Seminar in Higher Education (W. Damon, M. Stevens) (4) (HE)
Major issues, current structural features of the system, the historical context that shaped it, and theoretical frameworks. The purposes of higher education in light of interest groups including students, faculty, administrators, and external constituents. Issues such as diversity, stratification, decentralization, and changes that cut across these groups.
EDUC 347/GSBGEN 348 The Economics of Higher Education (E. Bettinger) (4) (HE) 
Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload: costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
EDUC 349 Comparative Higher Education (F. Ramirez) (3-4) (HE) 
This course examines the expansion, impact, and organization of higher education across the world. This course engages students with sociological theory and comparative research that focus on the factors that influence the expansion of universities, the individual and societal impacts of higher education, and change and persistence in the organization of the university. Lastly, this course emphasizes the impact of globalization on universities. 
EDUC 354 School-Based Decision Making (G. Hoagland) (4) (PK12, NP) 
Designed with aspiring school leaders in mind, this course combines case studies, site visits, and guest speakers to take students inside school leaders' critical decision making processes. Students who wish to work at the district and school levels may be interested in this course to learn the challenges, opportunities, and contemporary practices of school-site leadership.
MS&E 274 Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy (E. Tse) (3) (NP, ET) 
This course explores how entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change of responding to change induced externally. Students will learn about advantage in emerging markets and mature markets, strategies to break through stagnation, and strategies to turn danger into opportunity. 

Theory 

EDUC 122Q Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (T. Ehrlich) (3) (PK12, HE, EP, NP)
This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
EDUC 208B Curriculum Construction (D. Pope) (3-4) (PK12)
Practical aspects of curriculum design are emphasized by students working on projects for actual education clients. May be adapted to issues in higher education.
EDUC 245 Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (T. LaFromboise) (3-5) (PK12)
This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
EDUC 220C Education and Society (F. Ramirez) (4-5) (PK12, HE, EP)
Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
EDUC 288 Organizational Analysis (W. Powell) (4) (PK12, HE, EP, NP)
Pre-K - 12, higher education, and non-profit focused students should take this survey of major theoretical traditions to understand rational and non-rational behaviors of organizations. This knowledge can be applied to schools, districts, CMOs, colleges, universities, and non-profits as formal organizations. 
EDUC 341 Counterstory and Narrative Inquiry in Literature and Education (A. Antonio, J. Willihnganz) (3) (PK12, HE, EP)
Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
EDUC 342 Child Development & New Technologies (B. Barron, K. Forssell) (3) (PK12)
This course is for students interested in the experiences of children with computing technologies and how these might influence development. The course uses sociocultural theories of development to understand how children use technology to meet their own goals, with an emphasis on the influence of interactive technology on cognitive, identity, and social development. 
EDUC 347/GSBGEN 348 The Economics of Higher Education (E. Bettinger) (4) (HE)
Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class. 
EDUC 378 Social and Emotional Learning: Conceptual & Measurement Issues (J. Obradovic) (3) (PK12)
Social and emotional learning (SEL) is an umbrella term for the malleable, non-academic skills that support educational outcomes, such as school readiness, classroom behaviors, and academic achievement. In this course, we will discuss theoretical frameworks, empirical studies, and measurement issues pertaining to the intrapersonal SEL skills: self-control/executive functions, emotion regulation, intrinsic motivation, persistence, and growth mindset. We will also discuss school districts’ efforts to promote and assesses students' SEL skills.

Skills 

EDUC 200B Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods (D. Pope, J. Wolf) (4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
Students who are confident in their ability to read and understand published research (particularly quantitative) should take this course to broaden their understanding of research methods and uses. Course material and hands-on activities are likely to be directly applicable to the POLS Project/Talk.
EDUC 208B Curriculum Construction (D. Pope) (3-4) (PK12)
Practical aspects of curriculum design are emphasized by students working on projects for actual education clients. May be adapted to issues in higher education.
EDUC 399A Designing Surveys (A. Porteus) (1-2) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
This course is focused entirely on developing good surveys using a cognitive processing model for survey development. The course  is for students who are designing surveys  for master’s projects/theses, and PhD dissertations.  The course is experiential and more like a workshop, so students must be developing an actual survey to enroll in the course.
EDUC 423 Introduction to Data Science (D. McFarland) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
Social scientists can benefit greatly from utilizing new data sources like electronic administration records or digital communications, but they require tools and techniques to make sense of their scope and complexity. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply popular data science techniques regarding data visualization, data reduction and data analysis.
ME 368 d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context (P. Klebahn, K. Segovia, R. Sutton, et al.) (1-3) (PK12, HE)
d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
MS&E 277 Creativity and Innovation (R. Cox.) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, ET)
This course is for students who want to gain experience with promoting creativity and innovation using workshops, case studies, field trips, expert guests, and team projects.e
PSYCH 146 Observation of Children (P. Chandra, A. Lomangino, J. Winters) (3-5) (PK12)
Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.
PSYCH 147 Development in Early Childhood (M. Peters, B. Wise) (3-5) (PK12, NP)
Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.

Knowledge

EDUC 217 Free Speech, Academic Freedom, and Democracy (E. Callan) (3)
The course examines connected ideas of free speech, academic freedom, and democratic legitimacy that are still widely shared by many of us but have been subject to skeptical pressures both outside and inside the academy in recent years. The course explores the principled basis of these ideas, how well they might (or might not) be defended against skeptical challenge, and how they might be applied in particular controversies about the rights of students, instructors, and researchers.
EDUC 218 Topics in Cognition and Learning: Technology and Multitasking (B. McCandliss, R. Pea) (3) (PK12, NP)
Executive function is a construct that is rapidly taking on an increasingly central role in bringing together current research in cognitive development, learning, education, and neuroscience. In this seminar we will examine the potential cross-fertilization of these fields of inquiry primarily by reviewing research on learning and individual differences in cognitive neuroscience that may hold relevance to education, as well as reviewing educational research that may hold implications for developmental cognitive neuroscience. This seminar course is designed to engage students in recent advances in this rapidly growing research area via discussions of both historical and late-breaking findings in the literature. By drawing on a breadth of studies ranging from cognitive development, cognitive neuroscience, and educational/training studies, students will gain an appreciation for specific ways interdisciplinary approaches can add value to specific programs of research.
EDUC 306B The Politics of International Cooperation in Education (P. Bromley) (3-5) (PK12, HE, EP)
Education policy, politics, and development. Topics include: politics, interests, institutions, polity, and civil society; how schools and school systems operate as political systems; how policy making occurs in educational systems; and theories of development. 
EDUC 386 Leadership and Administration in Higher Education (J. Calvert, W. Chiang) (4) (HE, EP)
Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.  
MS&E 254 The Ethical Analyst (R. Howard) (1-3) (EP)
This course is aimed at students who wish to be professional analysis. Students will learn about the ethical responsibility for consequences of analysis who used technical knowledge to support organizations or government. The course explores how to form ethical judgments and questions the means to any end. 

Theory 

EDUC 232 Culture, Learning, and Poverty (R. McDermott) (2-3) (PK12)
For students interested in learning about the actual process of policy making, this course offers a behind-the-scenes look at the political process of public policy making at the Federal level. Students will learn about the theory and literature behind policy formulation and will engage in debates over past and current efforts at policy reform.
EDUC 314 Technologies, Social Justice, and Black Vernacular Culture (A. Banks) (3-5) (PK12, HE)
From texts to techne, from artifacts to discourses on science and technology, this course is an examination of how Black people in this society have engaged with the mutually consitutive relationships that endure between humans and technologies. We will focus on these engagements in vernacular cultural spaces, from storytelling traditions to music and move to ways academic and aesthetic movements have imagined these relationships. Finally, we will consider the implications for work with technologies in both school and community contexts for work in the pursuit of social and racial justice. Course is open to master's and doctoral students only.
EDUC 306B The Politics of International Cooperation in Education (P. Bromley) (3-5) (PK12, HE, EP)
Education policy, politics, and development. Topics include: politics, interests, institutions, polity, and civil society; how schools and school systems operate as political systems; how policy making occurs in educational systems; and theories of development. 

Skills

EDUC 278 Introduction to Issues in Evaluation (M. Ruiz-Primo) (3-4) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
Open to master's and doctoral students with priority to students in the School of Education. Focus is on the basic literature and major theoretical and practical issues in the field of program evaluation. Topics include: defining purpose, obtaining credible evidence, the role of the evaluator, working with stakeholder, values in evaluation, utilization, and professional standards. The course project is to design an evaluation for a complex national or international program selected by the instructor.
EDUC 290 Instructional Leadership: Building Capacity for Excellent Teaching (D. Brazer) (3-4) (PK12)
Designed with aspiring school leaders in mind, this course helps students understand how teacher learning and organizational learning are generated to improve educational quality at the school and district level. Students who wish to work at the district level may be interested in this course to learn a perspective on addressing school improvement.
EDUC 391 Engineering Education and Online Learning (M. Stevens) (3) (HE, ET)
An introduction to best practices in engineering education and educational technology, with a focus on online and blended learning. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the field, students will experiment with a variety of education technologies, pedagogical techniques, and assessment methods.
CEE 251 Negotiation (S. Christensen) (3) (PK12, HE, NP)
This is an interactive course for students who wish to learn how to prepare for and conduct negotiations, from getting a job to managing conflict to negotiating transactions, all of which can occur in the school setting..
MED 247 Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (M. Kiernan, M. Stefanick) (3) (PK12, HE, NP, EP)
While not specifically focused on educational research, this course is designed for students who would like to develop their skills in designing, implementing, and analyzing structured interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and field observations.
OB 372 High-Performance Leadership (S. Levine) (4) (PK12, HE, NP)
This course asks the question: "What does it take to build high-performance?" The focus is on middle and upper-middle management in contemporary organizations that have complex tasks, exist in a rapidly changing environment, and have highly skilled subordinates. The premise of the course is that traditional methods of management may produce adequate levels of performance but prevent excellence from developing. New approaches to leadership will be presented that are more likely to lead to a truly high-performing system. Time will be spent discussing the components of effective leadership, what a manager can do to build a compelling vision, strong teams, and mutual influence sideways and upwards as well as with direct reports. Also, what members can do to support the leader who wants to initiate such changes. In addition to class, students will meet for 2 1/2 hours each week in a Skill Development Group to apply the course material to their own personal development. (While there is minimal overlap in content between OB 372 and OB 374 and these two classes are highly complementary, both require Journals and an evening group. We recommend against taking both classes in the same quarter for workload reasons.) Students will have a choice as to when their SDG will meet. The expectation is full attendance at all SDG meetings. Only one excused class absence. Attendance is required in EIS Simulation and the Consulting Project classes.
PSYCH 146 Observation of Children (P. Chandra, A. Lomangino, J. Winters) (3-5) (PK12)
Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.
PSYCH 147 Development in Early Childhood (M. Peters, B. Wise) (3-5) (PK12, NP)
Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.

Cross-listed courses

Every year we also offer a number of cross-listed courses. These courses are thoughtfully constructed and taught by renowned scholars and professors and fulfill course requirements for both the MA and the MBA components of your joint degree.

2016-2017 Cross-listed courses

Internship

Students are encouraged to pursue an Internship as an important part of their MA/MBA experience.

Admissions Process

Prospective Joint MA/MBA candidates must first apply to the GSB, indicating on their application that they are interested in applying to the Joint MA/MBA degree with the GSE. When you check the box on your GSB application indicating your interest, you will be prompted to complete an additional Statement of Purpose; this is your application to the GSE. The entire application is submitted together as part of the GSB application.

If you are admitted to the MBA program, the GSB will forward your entire application to the GSE. As an alternative, you may apply to the MBA program only and, if admitted, apply to the MA part of the joint degree program during your first quarter at the GSB.

MA/MBA Fellowships

Fellowships for Joint MA/MBA students are developed and administrated through the Graduate School of Business. The GSB receives support from individuals, foundations, and corporations for a variety of fellowship funds that are distributed based on need—not merit. Fellowships are available to all U.S. and international financial aid applicants. Outside fellowships can be distributed based on need or merit and we invite you to explore these outside options. For more information, please visit the GSB financial aid section (link is external) of their website.

Some international MA/MBA students from Brazil may be eligible for funds from the Lemann Foundation. Recipients are selected by Stanford GSE faculty.

If you are admitted to the MA/MBA program, you will be charged the GSB tuition rate for the first six quarters of the program and the GSE tuition rate for the seventh quarter, should you decide to enroll for an additional quarter.

Contacts

MA/MBA Questions

GSE Admissions Office
gseadmissions@stanford.edu
Tel: (650) 723-2115

David Brazer
MA/MBA Program Director
dbrazer@stanford.edu

Please visit the Stanford GSB admissions website for information about applying to the MA/MBA program.

Students beginning their first year of the Stanford MBA program who are interested in the Joint Degree may apply by the fall quarter deadline using a paper application through the Stanford GSE.